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Houstonian 1987
The Classrooms
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24783.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24783

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Classrooms, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24783.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Classrooms
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_155.jpg
Transcript Dr. Ed Hungerfor, physics, $400,000 to develop advanced linear accelerator devices. Dr. Ben Jansen, electrical engineering, $340,000 to research digital signals and images. Dr. Larry Kevan, chemistry, $325,000 to study metals of catalytic importance with an eye co developing better catalysts. Dr. Stuart Long, electrical engineering, $385,000 to research integrated printed circuit antennas. Dr. J. Andrew McCammon, chemistry, $250,000 for computer aided design of mole- cudes for use in agriculture, chemistry and medicine. Drs. John McDonald and Gerald Gardner, Allied Geophysical Laboratories, $270,000 to use seismic waves in mapping partially depleted oil and gas reservoirs. Dr. Robert Nerem, mechanical engineering, $500,000 to accelerate the efforts in mammalian cell culture technology. Dr. Donald Pitts, optometry, $650,000 to use new high technology optics in corrective devices for the eye. Drs. Gerry Speitel and James Symons, civil engineering, $285,000 for study of microorganisms in the treatment of organic chemical pollution. Dr. C. S. Ting, physics, $280,000 for the theoretical investigation of transport of hot electronics in small sized semiconductor devices. Dr. Shiao-Chun Tu, biochemical sciences, $250,000 to study luminescence immunoassays as an alternative to radioisotopes immunoassays. Dr. Marvin Vestal, chemistry, $444,667 to develop and make available new high performance chromatography and spectrometry techniques for the life sciences. Dr. Roy Weinstein, physics, $600,000 for development of a calorimeter for use in high-energies. Dr. Jack Wolfe, electrical engineering, $425,000 to research solutions to several problems in integrated circuit manufacturing- Strides* Material in this section with an asterisk (*) is reprinted from Strides Magazine, a product of Media Relations. In the not too distant future, home computers may perform faster and stereo systems may sound better because of a research and development effort starting at the University of Houston this year. The National Aeronautics and Space Administration has awarded the campus $5.5 million to fund a Center for the Commercial Development of Space. This center will develop applications for the vacuum in low earth orbit, a process ex pected to lead to the production of high quality microelectronics and computer components in space. The UH center is officially designated as the Center for the Commercial Development of Space Vacuum Epitaxy Technology. Physics professors Paul C. W. Chu and Alex Ignatiev will serve as Director and Associate Director, respectively. Sponsored through NASA's Office of Commercial Programs, the center receives five years of NASA seed funding. By the end of that period, NASA expects the center to be in a position to operate without NASA funding under support provided from a combination of public and private sources. In addition to NASA's commitment, Univeristy Park will provide $1 million of support through space, equipment, and cost sharing, and a current consortium of seven industry and government organizations has committed $900,000 for the first year. However, during its first five years, the center may attract in excess of $16 million in support from a consortium expected to have more than 15 supporting organizations from industry, government, and higher education. The vacuum epitaxy technique, incorporation molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and chemical beam epitaxy (CBE), is a high-technology process that grows thin films of extremely pure material almost atom by atom. In fact, it has been described as the most powerful technique for materials synthesis, according to Chu. However to achieve high purity, the process relies on an ultrahigh vacuum environment, something that is difficult to achieve in large volumes on earth. That is the unique aspect of this center; the proposed use of the vacuum in space for development and production of the next generation of microelectronics and computer chips. "Previous efforts have focused on the advantages of the zero-gravity environment of space. Ours is the first proposal to take advantage of the space vacuum," Chu says. The naturally-occurring vacuum in low earth orbit is not as good as the best vacuum achievable on earth, Chu says. However, with a little manipulation, low earth orbit space becomes an ultra-high vacuum much better than vacuums attainable on earth. The manipulation is done by a structure called a wake shield. As the shield passes through space, it literally clears the way of atoms and molecules, creating an ultra-high vacuum directly behind the shield, Ignatiev ex- 155