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Houstonian 1987
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The University. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24715.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The University. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24715

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The University, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24715.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The University
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_087.jpg
Transcript A Look Back With Turner If you search the ARA building, the pink barn that is located between the new Architecture building and the Law building and resembles an airplane hangar, you can find the office of Dr. Bridges Alfred Turner. Turner is coordinator for a college of Engineering program that matches accomplished minority students with large engineering firms. But that is not the reason we went to see him. We looked him up because we needed historical information about Third Ward. What we found was a 78 year old treasure chest full of the gems of time. Turner has lived in Third Ward since 1948. He left a tenured position at Virginia's Hampton Institute to take a job as Dean for the School of Industries at Texas State College for Negroes, known since 1951 as Texas Southern University. The college had been established as a facility for blacks in 1947 by the 50th Texas State Legislature in order to keep those students out of UT. Turner saw the new institution as a challenge and as an opportunity. If you catch Turner when he is not busy, he might give you a tour of Third Ward. But the tour won't start at TSU, or on McGregor, or at Riverside. Those places are recent additions to Third Ward. The main street of old Third Ward was Dowling Street. If you get in his Buick he'll take you there. It's about 18 blocks from UH, straight down Elgin. "Now this was the main street in the Third Ward for black people when I came here," he'll tell you when you get there. "This is old Third Ward." Turning right onto Dowling, Turner points out Emancipation Park. He says the park was established in Third Ward because blacks couldn't go into the white parks.' "If you went they might run you out." A bit farther down the road Turner points to a building that is missing its roof and one oi its walls. "Now this building here was a theatre where blacks could attend You see Mac ks couldn't go downtown to the theaters when I came here. If they did, they had to sit in the balcony." Three blocks from Dowling is the house Turner moved into when he first came to Houston. It is a large house, but the Turners occupied only a small portion. At that time it was a nice house. Now the paint is peeling and the screen in the door has been replaced by boards. It is the middle of the day, during the middle of the week and there are five or six men hanging around on the porch. We look at the house from Turner's car, and then drive on. As we are pulling away, Turner points to the house next door. "That house was occupied by a black dentist named Dr. John W. Davis. He was one of the leading black people at that time — from the standpoint of wealth, and from the standpoint of being trusted, shall I say, by white people." "You get what I'm saying? I'm just giving it to you as it was." As we drive, Turner explains how Third Ward moved, or expanded to include the area that now surrounds the University of Houston. "It was a matter of black people buying where they used to couldn't buy," he explained. "Because o( chat, people just started calling it Third Ward. We were- identified, when I came here, as just living in certain areas." When Turner came to Houston, blacks didn't live on this side <>f Alabama Street. One block past Alabama, < oming towards illi, he turns the car to the left. Now this Truxillo. White people lived all in here. You notice the curb is paved. This was completely off limits to blacks." Turner pulls over where Truxillo dead ends at a railroad track "See that house there.'' That was the first house owned by a black man on this side of Alabama. Dr. Samuel Warren bought this from a white policeman. And when he bought this house, then people began to get a little excited." On the next street over, Turner points out the house he bought in 1949. At the time, Turner was the only black man on the block. ""49 was when the unrest began," Turner says. There was no public announcement but it was understood that the community would be occupied by blacks. "It was talked about in the Kiwanis Club and at the Chamber of Commerc r and what have you," Turner says. "It gets around. When black people started buying over here the news spread. People said you better move out because the black people are gonna move in by ya.' And they began to run, block after block after block." I >,uuel Alder