Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1987
The University
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The University. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24712.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The University. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24712

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The University, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24712.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The University
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_084.jpg
Transcript Calling the failure to perform that role an abdication of responsibility, Lede said, "There are two worlds in Third Ward, those who are part of the community, that live in the community and are involved, and those who are transients." She claims that the difference between UH and TSU is that "you have one institution that is a part of the community, and another institution that is in the community. Unless the university tailors programs which mandate in- volvment, particularly where there is a difference in income levels, that's what you have, a high degree of transiency." Looking for solutions to area problems, Lede suggested that a combined effort involving all area institutions could revitalize the neighborhood socially, psychologically, and economically. Moore agrees that the universities can be instrumental in improving the quality of life in the community, but in a much less direct way than that proposed by Lede. He said, "I see a lot of common interest between TSU and UH in improving the student environment. As more students live in the area, more and better businesses are present to help everybody." Moore also thinks that UH can play an important role in minority education, and as a major employer in the area. He said "Economic development is a spinoff of what we do, but it is not our primary purpose. While it is tempting to think we can provide a direct solution, I think that is a mistake. What we do best, and what the state asks us to do, is to provide education for people at the college and graduate level, and to conduct research." Moore challenged the idea that UH is not involved in the surrounding area. "There are a lot of projects we do in the community," he said. "We do outreach in the arts, the School of Education does outreach programs and other schools within the university do outreach programs that are related to their mission and that have practical consequences for the community." UH has been highly involved in two area magnet schools, and the School of Optometry provides much needed services to the community. Dr. Jerald Strickland, an Associate Dean with the Optometry College, said that surveys show as much as 20 percent of the customers that visit the on-campus clinic level within a few miles of UH. He said the clinic offers services to some people on a "pay- what-you-can basis," and that he knows of no one who has been turned away. The call for economic revi- talization in Third Ward presents some sticky questions. John Gildrebloom, a sociology professor at UH, thinks that UH could play an important role in economic revitalization. He talked about the possibility of a center for neighborhood development that would be attached to UH's Center for Public Policy. Gilderbloom envisions a program in which the university would help rehabilitate and build up neglected neighborhoods. "We are active- • ly talking about developing a whole program around that," he said. "I think a key need is to really work in these neglected neighborhoods and an excellent place to start would be the Third Ward." Gilderbloom called the neighborhood "a fascinating area," and said it would be a good laboratory for both students and professors. Both Gilderbloom and Bullard think the Third Ward will experience some kind of revitalization when the economy turns around. Both sociologists think the best way for that change to occur is through a joint venture involving both universities, the community, businesses, and city and state government. But Bullard sees some obstacles to this process. He said he isn't sure a joint venture is possible given the climate of mistrust and the history of development in Houston. "Houston does not have a good record in terms of redeveloping areas and minimizing displacement," said Bullard. He said the city is not real big on public-private joint ventures either. "Generally private initiative is considered the best route," he said. "If the government gets involved, it has to have a plan for replacement housing and that type of thing. So the city has taken a hands- off approach and let the private sector do its thing." Bullard said private sector redevelopment has lead to some problems. "Ultimately what happens is you have the displacement and you have the distrust and Paul Vincent Kuntz — shown here posing with two of his favorite subjects, Roosevelt Gunnie and Ida B. Johnson-Gunnie — began a two year commitment to photograph the Third Ward in January, 1986. Kuntz hopes that after the project's completion in January, 1988 he will be able to exhibit the series in its entirety. t 9 %'•■$. i -1 84