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Houstonian 1987
The University
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The University. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 23, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24684.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The University. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24684

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The University, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 23, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24684.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The University
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_056.jpg
Transcript Are You Ready For The New Age? To the founders of the Aquarian Society, the New Age meant a future time of world peace under the direction of a one-world government. Idealis- tically, if there were only one governmental power in the world, there could be no war. As the leader of the government, Lucifer (yes, the fallen angel of Genesis) would create an earthly kingdom that he would rule. Aquarians, the true New Agers, do not equate Lucifer and Satan as the same being. Instead, they see Satan as an abstract force of evil in the world and Lucifer as the giver of knowledge, one who can make men as gods, as he promised Eve in the Garden. Most Aquarians believe in the history recorded in Genesis of the fall of man, but do not believe in the Biblical view that Lucifer intended on destroying man for his own benefit. They believe Lucifer desires only to help mankind. Over the course of the last century, since the founding of the Aquarian Society, the concept of a New Age has changed. The average New Ager is one who holds a humanistic view of mans' progression to a god-like state through promoting world peace and love to fellow man. They usually include one or more mystical systems in their beliefs such as astrology or Transendental Meditation. The popular slogan, "Visualize World Peace," is a New Age ideal as well as the goal of ending world hunger. However, the average present-day New Ager usually does not believe in Lucifer, but does hold that Satan is a term used to describe the evil in the world. These themes are illustrated in the original New Age music through chants, dreamy melodies, etc. Recently a new form of music, a cross between speed metal and industrial noise, is creating a scene of its own. And they call it New Age, however blasphemous to the original ideals of the Aquarians. Worshipping Satan instead of Lucifer, and only slightly resembling the true New Age music in its droning, the inconsistency is probably an attempt to ridicule the conservative Christians' suspicions that the New Age fulfills Biblical prophecies of the apocalypse. Or even more likely, it is an attempt to ridicule the media's sensationalization of heavy metal satanic cults. Whatever the goal, the means is big amplifiers, smoke and haze and bizarre stage antics. A true New Ager would simply die at the sight of it. From the first mic check, "sssix-sssix-sssix," to their final echoing of "satan-satan-satan," an open-minded person can find the sarcasm humorous, while a television crew in search of a story could have a field day. So, whether the New Age holds Luciferic commitment, enlightenment of God through Jesus Christ, or post-hardcore music, are you ready? — Darrell Hutto 5b