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Houstonian 1987
The University
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The University. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 17, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24671.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The University. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24671

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The University, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 17, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24671.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The University
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_043.jpg
Transcript Sam Diadone's house, the one he built more than 50 years ago, is still much like it was before the University of Houston and the fast food restaurants took over the neighborhood. Full of antiques, oddities, and things, the Diadone home on Cullen Boulevard isn't just an ordinary, white, two story house you can see on any old street. A step inside the front door is no less than a trip back in time. Each piece of stained glass, old bottle or sign has a story Diadone is glad to tell. Sam Diadone, the man who for 80 years hasn't wanted to fish, hunt or play golf, decided long ago that his passion would be collecting anything "old and interesting." But it was by accident that his home ended up as full as it is. Diadone faced hard times when he began a neon sign shop over 50 years ago. "At the time, I didn't even have enough money to buy a hamburger," he says. "I was dating my wife, Ce- cile, and she would have to buy it for me." Diadone's fortune, however, slowly changed. A local plumber had ordered a sign, but was unable to pay for it. Instead, he offered Diadone a 1930 Model A sedan for the work. From that he eventually built a fleet of 30 antique cars before selling them to Judge Roy Hofheinz. Sam's passion for antiques led to a friendship with Hofheinz, who stopped by the Diadone house one day in the '60s when he saw antiques in the front yard. The judge knocked, went in, liked what he saw and offered to buy it all. Diadone then decided to hand his sign shop down to his son-in-law so that he could begin buying antiques for Hofheinz on a full-time basis. The seed was planted. "Being a very ardent collector of antiques, there was no stopping me," he says. "I sacrificed every penny that my company made." Spitting on the floors: Diadone's passion for collecting, however, wasn't limited to cars. Over the years, his house has filled up with numerous collections and has evolved into a kind of museaum. The trip through time begins upon entering his house. Diadone pauses to point out his favorite collections — old whiskey bottles, a prized Jim Beam Bottle that dates back to 1900, old buttons, cut glass. He pauses by a glass case and reaches in to take out what looks like a hollow glass goat horn. "This is a limousine vase. Every morning, the chauffeur would put fresh cut flowers in it for the lady of the house. The vase was attatched to the side rear-view mirror." Sam restored most of the antiques in the house himself. And the many signs indicate that it's the only place in town where a T-bone steak still sells for 63 Sam Daidone 2814 Cullen Houston, TX. 77004 cents a pound, potatoes are 39 cents for 10 pounds and bread is 31 cents a loaf. Beside these old general store specials are advertisements, posters and signs from long ago. One sign boasts, "Taxi — Reduced Rates 35 cents Anywhere in the Old City limits — ABC Taxi." Another sign warns, "Spitting on the Floors or Walls Prohibited By Order of the Board of Health." In yet another corner of the room, "No Dogs or Sailors are Allowed on Grass. Along the side of one wall, on a dusty table sits Diadone's beer bottle collection. He holds up a can of Billy Beer and then looks over to a can of Gilley's beer. "Neither of these beers is any good," Diadone says. "Some people think just because it has their name on it makes it a good beer." He picks up a bottle of Grand Prize beer. "Howard Hughes made this beer right here in Houston on Polk Street. It wasn't any good, but the bottles are worth about $8 apiece." Golfing pants and a matching vest with a bold tie from the roaring '20s drape an antique chair, as if they were never put away after they were worn. Cobwebs have taken over an old scale and are creeping over to an antique sewing machine that looks only a few years removed from needles and thread. Nearby are old maps of Texas where Harris County is written bigger than Houston, an old mousetrap that would have drowned its victims, and the Houston Daily Post dated April 18, 1901 that boldly declares on its front page: "Briton Loses Ground, The Unrest Continues." Nothing at all: Sam walks to another corner of the house and picks up a piece of thick, round glass that used to be a part of a car. "This is a lense from a Rick- enbacker, a car named after the 43