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Houstonian 1987
The Issues
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24665.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24665

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24665.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_037.jpg
Transcript In October, Jane Biakeddy, a traditional Dine (Navajo) elder from Big Mountain charged, in a translation by her son, that "the white man's lust for coal and uranium is tantamount to genocide of the traditional people of the land." She was speaking of the abundant minerals which exist in the Four Corners region where the U.S. government is interested in the valuable ore. Biakeddy, who was on a tour of colleges around the nation trying to stop forced relocation of 14,000 Navajo Indians, addressed a small crowd in front of the Satellite about the conflict which has divided the Hopi and Navajo people. She reported, in her native language, that the two nations, along with other peaceful indians, lived in harmony for hundreds of years before the white man's exploitation of the land and people. Biakeddy and her delegation delivered the message that the Dine (Navajo) Nation is committed to resisting relocation plans and that they will remain on Big Mountain, just north of the Hopi reservation. The Hopis are in agreement with Dine efforts to prevent a land dispute. The Hopis also realize that the Navajo reservation, which surrounds the Hopi reservation in northeast Arizona, has served as a buffer between the Hopis and the rest of the United States. They also regard the Navajo reservation as "the last line of defense." 37