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Houstonian 1987
The Issues
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24657.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24657

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24657.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_029.jpg
Transcript Middle East. From a safe distance, Americans speculate that the communists are behind the problems of the world, but would be appalled and refuse to think that the U.S. promotes this kind of senseless killing by its actions in places like Nicaragua, El Salvador and South Africa. Many Americans continue to believe it is up to us to make the world safe for democracy, and at the same time, they become immune to the realities in the world and even fail to take notice of our problems at home. While the U.S. holds on to the old idea that a strong military that is visible throughout the world will protect our homeland, other countries have found another defense — economics. The Japanese receive 50% of their oil through the Persian Gulf, Western Europe 26% and the U.S. 6%. But when Iran threatened the transporting of oil through the gulf, the U.S. was quick to send in the military. While the Japanese are concerned because they need the oil for plastic products, they have an economic strength greater than military might. The U.S. on the other hand, continues to spend millions on a military that is nearly obsolete. We have a massive unemployment rate in our own oilfields. And our policies at home have made the traditional American farmer nearly extinct. The U.S. government is primarily concerned with big business and by this we have stretched capito- lism to new limits — in the constant struggle for bigger profits and more productivity, big businesses have taken manufacturing out of American hands and into inferior countries where labor is cheap and regulations are few. While the economic growth of those countries is stifled, corporate leaders see it as more of a business deal than a human rights issue. !■■! In short, we import goods that American corporations produce at low costs in foreign countries and then sell them to American people in a country where inflation and unemployment is up and the usefulness of a high standard of luxuries is down. But as long as upper class Americans continue to see profits, they will remain blind to the sinking foundation of the middle class. With unemployment and the lower class expanding in the U.S., the military industry has reached its highest point since World War II. The ever present threat of communism keeps funding of the military on the increase. So, while countries like Japan and West Germany surpass the U.S. in technology exports, the U.S. remains the world leader in missile exports. And the U.S. continues to come into conflict with other countries' business in every part of the world. — Mark Lacy Three old men squabble over a cheap bottle of liquor in the heart of our nations capitol. Photos by Mark Lacy. 29