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Houstonian 1987
The Issues
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 29, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24655

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 29, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24655.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_027.jpg
Transcript Poppy, once native to regions of southeast Asia, is now being harvested in Mexico and processed in remote shacks before being smuggled across the border into the U.S. "Driving that train, high on cocaine. Casey Jones you better watch your speed. Trouble ahead, trouble behind ..." Maybe I should've paid more attention to the lyrics, or maybe I just should have paid more attention. I knew I hadn't seen that guy around the apartment before, but I was more intent on catching a buzz than finding out who he was. What did I care, I'd scored and that was all that mattered. Now it was time to crank up the stereo, take a few tokes and get my head together. All I could think about as I turned up the "Dead" was that this rock better be worth the trouble I had gone through to get it. As I began the ritual of carefully loading my pipe, I prepared myself for the first blast. It had been almost a day since I had scored any coke. The first hit scorched my throat and burned all the way to the bottom of my lungs, but I didn't care because I knew that by the second or third toke, my throat would be too numb to feel the pain, and besides, I was getting used to it. I held that first hit in my lungs as long as I could, the buzz began about the same time. I closed my eyes and tilted my head back enjoying the spinning sensation in my head and the tingling feeling in my fingers and toes. It was like all the troubles in the world had been lifted off my shoulders, as if by magic. I didn't have a care in the world, and I sure didn't feel like dealing with reality, so I took another toke. I was just about finished with that bowl when I thought I heard someone at the door. "Come on in, the door's open," (and the party's just getting started, I thought). The door didn't move. I thought it's probably just someone walking down the hall. My friends haven't been around in a while. So I load up another bowl and, I'm lighting up when, WHAM! The door comes crashing open, and in walks the guy I saw in the hall, and two cops. "What the hell?" "Shut up and get your hands up." "You can't come in here!" "You're under arrest." "You can't do that! You've gotta have a warrant or something! I know my rights!" "We've got a warrant and you're under arrest. Put your hands behind you and shut up. You have the right to remain silent. You have the right to ... " Cuffed, they take me downtown and book me. Then they put me in a holding tank with this worthless drunk who smells like he hasn't had a bath in a month. What the hell am I going to do? I've got one call, but I can't afford bail. I spent my last dime on coke. How am I going to explain this to my ole man? He thinks I'm spending all my money at the frat house. Dad's going to hit the roof when he finds out, and what if he finds out this isn't the first time. As the DEA kept a firm hold on drug trafficking in Florida, drug trade over the 2,000 mile border between the U.S. and Mexico increased. And that means the drug supply in Houston was never greater. The Houston Police Dept. routinely raids crack houses where "crack" or "rock", a potentially deadly form of cocaine is manufactured from poppy. After a raid on a crack house in the vicinity of UH, the police spray painted "Go ahead, make my day" across the front as a warning to others waiting to be busted. All of these things, even happening less than a mile from campus, seem distant until it happens to someone close to you. The hazards of cocaine become real when a friend drops out of school or can't cope with everyday life because of a love/ hate relationship with the drug. And it gets worse — that person stands a good chance of dying. Yet, the drug industry is thriving. Media attention soared when twenty-two year old Len Bias, a basketball player at the University of Maryland with a promising future, died of cocaine intoxication in June '86. He was just one in a long line of stars that have been victims of its deadly pleasure. Ex-football star Mercury Morris now does public service commercials encouraging kids to not wreck their lives with drugs the way he did. New York Mets' pitcher Dwight Gooden checked into a chemical dependencies rehabilitation center. Two Rockets players, Mitchell Wiggins and Lewis Lloyd were banned from the NBA for using cocaine. And when celebrities die from an overdose like John Belushi, books about their problematic lives become best sellers. But as actors and athletes continue to ruin their careers and their lives, they continue to glamourize the use of drugs — making profits for dealers better than ever. "I really will, say no-to- drugs," says Jim Mclngvale, a local advertiser. Local news personalities are in on it too. MTV, with their R.A.D. (Rock Against Drugs) campaign, is a part of the effort. They are all part of a massive anti-drug campaign. First Lady Nancy Reagan, in her War on Drugs, uses the slogan, "Say no to drugs," which was developed by the UH Social Psychology/Behavioral Medicine Research Group. Directed by Professor Richard Evans, the group originally developed the "say no" strategy to use against cigarette smoking among teenagers. Realizing the similarities that make teens suc- ceptable to peer pressure, the strategy was expanded to fight drug and alcohol addiction. Richard Evans, however, feels that this is not enough. And so, for the group, which is supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute, a huge task lies ahead. 11