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Houstonian 1987
The Issues
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 26, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24653.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24653

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 26, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24653.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_025.jpg
Transcript Unpleasant As It Is: Acquired Immune Syndrome ed among only 75 college students, the actual number is expected to be higher. Because the incubation period for the disease is from three months to five years, there will be many more cases surfacing. The bottom line is that a casual occur- ance which required little thought, may become a fatal mistake. But still the ignorance exists among college students. Fraternities across the nation have been known to ridicule the AIDS disease for a party theme. Most white middle class Americans have the attitude that their sexual practices are "invincible." They tend to believe that their partner, no matter how casual or committed, could not possible carry a sexually transmitted disease. Ironically, many of these people who feel secure around others of their own stereotype, share outrageous myths about Deficiency ways of contracting the disease. Some falsely believe the disease can be passed on by being in the presence of a person with AIDS. And some falsely believe they will get AIDS if they touch a homosexual. While others have even more ridiculous notions about the disease. The truth of the matter is that the virus which causes AIDS is spread from one person's blood or body fluid to that of another. It is not transmitted through the air, nor can the virus live on any dry surface, including healthy skin. It is primarily spread through sexual contact of any kind, or through intravenous drug use. It is not like many other diseases or unplanned pregnancy, however. A person can carry the virus for an undetermined amount of time, and continue to pass it on, undetected. — Mark Lacy Intravenous drug users are among the high risk groups that make up 91 percent of the 36,000 reported AIDS cases, along with male homosexuals and bisexuals. But AIDS can strike people of all races, males and females, young and old, and even children. It is estimated that 15 million people in the U.S. carry the virus. Because of the scare, some people are ordering a straw with their drink when they go out. While there are many myths about AIDS, it is not a myth that heterosexuals can contract the disease the same as people in high risk groups. Four percent of 36,000 reported AIDS cases are heterosexuals. That number is expected to increase drastically over the next 10-15 years. Some facts about AIDS as we understand them. They are not 100 percent conclusive. • There is not a test for AIDS. There is a test to determine if a person has been infected with the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) sometime in the past. It is estimated that 25-50 percent of persons infected with the HIV will develope AIDS, and an additional 25-30 percent will develope a less severe illness. It is uncertain why some infected with the HIV will develope AIDS and some will not. • Pregnant women who are infected with the HIV may pass the virus on to their unborn children. • Once infected, the virus may persist in the blood and body fluids, and can be passed on, for many years and possibly for life. • A person cannot contract AIDS by donating blood. • A person can develope AIDS even five years or more after being exposed to the virus. • The virus can be passed from female to male during intercourse, though it is more commonly passed from male to female or male to male. • In five years, health officials estimate that 270,000 Americans will have AIDS, an almost certain death for many of them. • There are no known drugs that will cure AIDS. While many universities and public schools are taking on the responsibility of sex education, some radical groups continue to spread myths about the AIDS disease. Photo by Mark Lacy. 2S