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Houstonian 1987
The Issues
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 29, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24652.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24652

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 29, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24652.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_024.jpg
Transcript AIDS continues to be a critical topic, such as on Channel 2's Evening News with Anchorman Ron Stone, along with other local and national news programs. But a large saturation of problems in the world today seems to have dulled the viewing public's senses. To many, AIDS is just another foreign crisis. AIDS; Someone Else's Problem? Aids is rapidly becoming the biggest threat to our planet, taking the lead in a neck and neck race with topics such as nuclear war and the ozone layer. While world leaders with a killing power 100 times over are able to discuss controlling nuclear weapons, AIDS is a much more abstract killer. Nuclear weapons have quantities and capabilities and are manufactured making them negotiable (even in theory). AIDS has become the great equalizer. No country desires it, nor can stop its spread. Even countries like the Soviet Union, where controls are tight, are stepping forward and admitting to a wide spread AIDS problem. Scientists believe that one out of every thirty males in the U.S. carries the disease, or its virus, making containment out of the question and a desperately needed vaccine the only answer. While ignorance of the situation can be found nearly everywhere, one has to wonder how politics may play a part in the race to find a cure. The AIDS virus was formally discovered in 1983. But it can be traced to deaths occuring before 1981. The number of cases has escalated yearly since then. By the end of the 1986-87 school year, the AIDS virus has accounted for nearly 21,000 deaths in the U.S. in seven years. The first International AIDS Conference didn't occur until 1985 in Atlanta, Georgia. In June of 1987, there was still ignorance of the disease at the Third International AIDS Conference in Washington, DC — an ignorance that will only continue to inflate controversy. Vice President George Bush was heckled as he read a list of the President's proposed safety measures to prevent the spread of AIDS in the U.S., a list that included mandatory testing for all immigrants into the country. He turned, believing that the microphone was off, and said, "Who was that, some gay group out there?". A very elitist attitude tends to surface in serious discussions about AIDS, but the 6,000 scientists present at the convention didn't find the plan to contain the disease, while overlooking the real need for a cure, to be very funny. Many social/economic groups have the misconception that AIDS is something for "other types" of people to be concerned about. College students are guilty of this belief. While AIDS has been report- 24