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Houstonian 1987
The Issues
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24651.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24651

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24651.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_023.jpg
Transcript Richard Murray On Politics And Gambling The term "politician" is often given to those officials tolerated by the public, while the title of statesman is reserved for admired public servants. Nevertheless, politicians and statesmen sometimes seek advice from political analysts such as Richard Wayne Murray, UH professor of political science. The Who's Who of American Men and Women of Social and Behavioral Sciences barely gives readers a clue about the expertise of Murray. It simply reads "Research: Party Politics in the U.S.". But for a political science teacher, Murray wears a variety of hats: analyst, prognosticator, lecturer, writer, adviser, speaker and poker player. Poker player? "Yes, and a serious one," Murray said. "Serious enough to lose $600 in one evening." Murray is the same relaxed, unassuming fellow whether he's lecturing a freshman government class, speaking to a women's political club or chatting in his office. But Murray is also recognized as a leading authority of Texans complained of fuel prices approaching $1.30 per gallon, but as the value of a barrel of oil declined from 1985 to '86 they were unemployed. city and state politics in Texas. A regular guest of KPRC's Channel 2 during election returns, Murray predicts election results like a professional billard player setting up his shots in a tournament — one at a time and with deliberate skill. He cites facts on political candidates like some television broadcasters zip through sports statistics. Murray predicted last year that the Select Committee on Higher Educations' recommendation to establish a multi- tiered system for state universities wouldn't survive in the Texas Legislature. Several months before university officials drew their swords for battle, he predicted, "Universities see this as a holy war and will die in the trenches before they allow it to become law." Murray also labeled Committee Chairman Templeton's short-lived idea to move Texas Southern University to the UH- Downtown campus as "a plan from Mars." Thirty days later, the Houston community loudly echoed Murray's response. Political reporters are familiar with Murray's colorful descriptions of politicians' rhetorical skills. He shows no apparent allegiance to one party and any candidate is fair game for potshots. Regarding last year's governor's race, "White's slick media image didn't compensate for his fatal mistake of passing major educational reform and leaving Texas teachers in the dark. Clements, however, isn't very effective with the media. It's like having your drunken brother-in-law over at the house for dinner when the preacher stops in for a visit. You hope he doesn't embarrass you." Murray is also quite fond of commenting on the local media's attempt to interpret political events. "Very few television stations have reporters that are politically knowlegeable," he said. "Houston stations are afraid to analyze political events. In their zealous attempt to give a balanced view, they usually say nothing!" As project director for the annual Houston Metropolitan Area Survey, Murray provides public policy makers with snapshots of the city's lifestyle, including job opportunities, government services, public transportation and crime problems, based on local residents' attitudes. "A survey, in some sense, is a snapshot," he said. "Attitudes are always changing. If you have a series of snapshots, you can see the change of residents' attitudes over time." Survey respondents are also quizzed on solving the state's current financial crisis. They rate the acceptability of cutting state programs, raising taxes, establishing a state lottery or legalizing pari-mutual betting. Murray said the percentage of supporters from previous surveys indicate that Texans will legalize race betting on horses and dogs this November. "Houston will be important because the mayoral election will be on the same day and there will be heavy voting," he said. "Proponents ought to carry the day." Time will tell if Murray hits the bull's eye again, but he knows that "any poker player would rather be lucky than good, any day." — James Millsap 23