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Houstonian 1987
The Issues
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24649.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24649

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24649.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_021.jpg
Transcript Hobby Calls For Reform — Or Else Lt. Gov. Bill Hobby says Texans will be unable to compete for jobs in the future unless community support for public school reform continues. "It is critical now to ensure that our budget crisis doesn't become an excuse to repeal school reform," he told area educators at the UH Hilton. "Our state faces a $6 billion gap between expected revenues and proposed spending levels. Public school spending is about 50 percent of our budget. Education may be expensive, but it is not a luxury." Texas needs strong support for its universities as well as elementary and secondary schools, he said. "By the year 2000, almost one-quarter of all jobs will require some college edcuation." Hobby said in an interview that UH shouldn't feel threatened by the Select Committee on Higher Education's proposal for regional university boards. "There seems to be a level of concern, (for UH's future) that is out of phase with any realistic problem," he said. "I don't see any particular advantage in having regional boards, and it will certainly never happen." The committee's recommendations would not change the role of state universities, he said. UH, UT-Dallas and other universities have equal opportunity to become major research institutions, because universities, not legislatures, determine their own fates, Hobby said. "UT-Dallas attracts an enormous amount of research dollars — perhaps more than UH does — not because they are treated differently by the appropriations bill, but because of the excellence of the university," he said. "UH is a major public institution in one of the largest metropolitan areas in the country, and it will in time come to re flect that." Hobby said the Legislative Budget Board appointed by Gov. Bill Clements has recommended a a $671 million education budget that would bring education funds back to the 1985 level and repair the damage of previous cuts. He said taxes will be raised to fund the increase, but he declined to speculate on the type or amount of tax that would be used. Hobby said the select committee's recommendations wouldn't change the status of UT or Texas A&M because only they have access to the Permanent University Fund. Clements' recommendations for higher education include tapping the PUF for research and other programs. But Hobby said the PUF battle was fought last summer. "The attempt to raise the funds didn't go anywhere," he said. "Things haven't changed." However, Hobby said, "that's not the only source of funds. UH's costs are offset by the Higher Education Fund (Proposition 2), and UH has access to construction money not available to A&M and UT. "You can't have 37 world- class universities. If UH wants to become a first-class research institution, it should attract the researchers. UH or any other institution has to earn the research fund," Hobby said. A university must develop its skills and excellence, and then come the funds." Hobby was at UH to address a conference, sponsored by the Center for Public Policy, on the consequences of House Bill 72. On that subject, he said he regretted that the public school reform got its impetus outside the educational community. "It is disappointing that the initiative for HB 72 came largely from our business community," he said. "Our teachers and administrators should be out front demanding higher achievement, rather than taking refuge in the status quo." Positive effects of school reform included better Scholastic Aptitude Test scores, uniform measures of academic achievement for students, evaluation of teachers' performance based on statewide standards, and increased state aid per student to $1,579 in 1986 from $1,315 in 1983, he said. "High school graduates are not, however, prepared to compete with progressive countries such as Japan or even old-fashioned Russians," Hobby said. "Our dropout rate is far too high when one-third of our ninth-graders don't finish high school and nearly one-fifth of adults haven't finished junior high school." — James Millsap "Lt. Governor Bill Hobby has taken a strong stand in favor of higher education," UH President Richard Van Horn said. At left Hobby addresses the special session of the legislature in Austin during the 1986 budget crisis. The State's decision to cut 10.5 percent from its higher education budget can mean big set-backs for UH, including vacant teaching positions, smaller variety of classes and possibly the elemination of entire degree programs. Photo by Dan Alder. Above Hobby discusses budget matters and reform measures in the Hilton Hotel lobby with James Millsap. Photo by Michael Williams. 2^