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Houstonian 1987
The Issues
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 29, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24643.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24643

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1987 - The Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 29, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24643.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1987_015.jpg
Transcript plot. Television is clearly the major source of information in this country — that's nothing new. The print media hangs on for the fact that it doesn't offer music videos, making it acceptable for waiting rooms and public transportation. And radio survives, fearful of the day when automobiles can steer themselves, leaving the driver free to watch TV on the way to school or work or to visit relatives in Oregon. But even as everything adopts itself to television (big screen movies on VHS for example), television is continually evolving. Now, when the President addresses the nation on the major networks, people can turn to a channel that offers music videos, a channel that offers Jesus, or even a channel that offers commercials (home shopping network). For the most part, people don't want to see the President on TV. People consider politics to be deceptive and, while television is only as deceptive as the audience allows it to be, they expect TV to be safe and noncommittal. When CBS aired "Our World", a program that chronicled the events that have led up to the world we live in, the program which featured Linda El- lerbe could not stand up against the fantasy-like "Cosby Show". But safe television programming dates back to "Father Knows Best" and "Leave It to Beaver." The difference being that in the sixties, people placed more value on their own individual thoughts and attitudes and weren't afraid to deviate from the traditional TV roles. People demonstrated against Vietnam and the dr^ft, while others gladly went to war in patriotic style. Even while the masses of that generation were screaming for the Beatles, they were more self-aware than the Madonna generation of today, of which one young Madonna (fan) said, "We want to express our individuality." On college campuses in the sixties, students took action against things they didn't like, and strongly supported things they did like. Today, people even seem apathetic towards their own interests and values. Where people used to protest the demoralization of their values, or stand up for their beliefs, they now hide out in fear that someone will point a finger at the quasi - liberal minds. For better or worse, society is more tolerant of things like living together, inter-racial relationships and divorce than it was in the sixties. Not that people have become more open-minded, but certainly more submissive. People are less likely to speak out against actions they dislike. Most people don't bother to involve themselves in a political or social conversation. In order to spark a small amount of interest in a discussion, political science professors generally begin with, "Did you see on TV ..." Television seems to dictate the topic of the day. And even then a large amount of students would just assume watch it on TV and sleep through it in class. So political science professors have a difficult time raising any interest in subjects that aren't in the media. While there are many concurrent issues, the media has to be selective. Some issues sell better than others. Some issues are technical and boring. And some issues are distasteful to the general public. The media will thrive on an issue only until the sellable angles are exhausted and people begin to lose interest. President Nixon was probably more heavily scrutinized than any president of today will be, certainly for his role in Watergate. President Reagan has gained very little recognition for his role, or lack of, in the similar Iran-Contra Affair. Issues which are complex in nature have very little audience. Even as the public has been presented with an entire slate of issues which are directly or indirectly related — Afganistan, El Salvador, Nicaragua, Cuba, South Africa, Phillipines, Ber- uit, Iran, Iraq, and so on — the scope is too broad for most to bother with. It is easy to get an impression through the media, and accept that the United States government is working "for the good of us all." And at the same time it is easy to overlook the humanistic issues and practicality behind nuclear arms, imperialism, investments in businesses that exploit people around the world and so on. Oddly enough, as people in this country feel they have achieved a free and liberated society, where people are free to chose their practices, people neglect to understand the implications of the future, the weakening class structure, the steadily rising poverty line, the endless wastefulness and the lack of hope for a large portion of our population including many college graduates. It seems as if history is working in reverse. Rights for individuals have taken the place of two cars in every garage, we are leaving behind a political scandal, going into a war and slipping back into a depression. So, while it is important to enforce individual rights for all across the board, the right to be free from political thought is actually a denial of freedom — if not for today, then for the future. — Mark Lacy 15