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Houstonian 1987
The Issues
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Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. 1987. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 4, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24642.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1987). Houstonian 1987 - The Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24642

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1987 - The Issues, 1987, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 4, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/25027/show/24642.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1987
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1987
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1987, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title The Issues
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1987_014.jpg
Transcript Sign Of The Times "It is the prescription for anarchy in a democratic society." Louis Stokes Senator, Ohio A Student's State of the Union Address. Today's college generation will probably be remembered by political historians as the "passive generation." The generation that grew up watching television through the late seventies and early eighties offers little in political motivation. One obvious reason for the great drought of political awareness is that this generation developed on the heels of a most embarrassing fiasco — Watergate — that is best remembered for having crowded out daytime TV programming for months. With the networks airing the Watergate hearings, and no cable TV to turn to, children of the seventies developed a great frustration with politics. Most of them have little or no rememberance of life before Watergate. The turbulant sixties is dry textbook material for most college students who not only take for granted, but cannot possibly remember the intense changes of that time period. While nearly everyone feels they have the right to observe a holiday in honor of Martin Luther King, most fail to recognize the value of the Civil Rights Movement. In only a few short years in history, the American public has gone from civil rights marches to the assassination of Martin Luther King, and from the assassination of Lee Harvey Oswald, the John F. Kennedy assassinator, to protests of the Vietnam War, and from Watergate to an obsession with Arbi- tron ratings. In a crucial time period when world affairs are esculating at a dangerous rate, college students are likely to remember the changing of the Coca-Cola formula or the entangled lives on "Dallas" as the issues of our time. Coca-Cola received more media coverage as people became angered over the elimination of the original formula Coke than the U.S. government did when the military overran the tiny island of Grenada. Public protest was able to bring back a worldwide commercial product, but it is very unlikely that the public could detour U.S. involvement in a global conflict. That is evident by the public attitude towards the Iran-Contra hearings. People were disturbed, mostly because the hearings interrupted the afternoon soaps. But the American public soon found an American hero in Oliver North for his noble television presence during the hearings. And even with such blatant foreshadowing, the American public generally accepts, without question, our role in the Persian Gulf. The American people hesitate to make any connection between the six percent of our oil that we defend as it is shipped through the Persian Gulf, while other countries relax, and the unemployment in our own oilfields that contributed to our weak economy. Another major oversight on the part of the American people is El Salvador. While a military advisor was killed there in April, a scene reminescent of Vietnam, the American people were preoccupied with Jim's sexual preferences and Tammy's makeup obsession in the PTL scandal. The people once again went with the best television 14