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Houstonian 2011
True Life
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Houstonian 2011 - True Life. 2011. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 26, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24461.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2011). Houstonian 2011 - True Life. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24461

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 2011 - True Life, 2011, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 26, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24461.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2011
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 2011
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 2011, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title True Life
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_2011_074.jpg
Transcript MUSLIM IN AMERICA By Zahra Ahmed When Ruqia Alherz sat down in her chemistry class, she was more than a little surprised that a young man took a seat right next to her. Not used to being in such proximity to a strange man, she took careful precautions throughout the rest of the class to make as little movement as possible so as not to touch him "I had this idea in my head that I shouldn't be sitting next to a man," said Alherz, a 19-year-old freshman international student in UH's pre-pharmacy program. In Alherz's native city of Al-Ahsa, Saudi Arabia, men and women - save for immediate family and spouses - usually go about their business separately. Although casual mixing of men and women is typical and almost inevitable in the states, it proved to be one of many new experiences for Alherz and her two friends. For three young Saudi Arabian women, being international students at UH has brought about many challenges and obstacles. Malak Ajina, a 23-year-old communication disorders student and Riyadh native, moved to Houston when her husband was accepted into the residency program at Baylor College of Medicine. Ajina wears a hijab and admitted to initially having difficulty making new friends because some people are uncertain on how to approach her. "I think that some people are afraid," she said. "They don't know how to start a friendship with me." But, she said, people are friendlier in the U.S. than in Riyadh. Shahad Nawab, a 23-year-old senior and health education major, came to the states with her family from the city of Jeddah when they picked Texas Children's Hospital for her brother to undergo treatment for an illness. She said her experience in Houston has helped her mature. "The American lifestyle forces you to grow up and become more tolerant," she said. "I didn't want to leave my home at first but now, I don't regret it. Moving to America and going to such a diverse university has helped by giving me a new way of thinking - by allowing me to be more accepting." For all three students, UH's diversity among its student population has been a major factor in making their stay in a new city easier. According to a report by the International Student and Scholar Services Office, UH is home to more than 3,600 international students. News [81]