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Houstonian 2011
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24423.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24423

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 2011 - News, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24423.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 2011
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title News
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_2011_036.jpg
Transcript KILLER QUAKE Japan is hit by 8.9 magnitude earthquake, leaving country in shambles The earthquake that hit near the east coast of Henshu, Japan, is the most powerful earthquake to hit the region. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons By Julian Jimenez 11,232 dead, 2,778 injured and 16,361 missing. Entire parking lots of cars swept away, businesses flooded, homes destroyed. Damages estimated between $122 billion and $235 billion. These images of the apocalypse became frighteningly real on March 11, 2011, as an 8.9 magnitude earthquake struck 250 miles northeast of Tokyo, triggering a tsunami that left Japan reeling as they struggled to recover. As the most powerful earthquake to hit Japan, and one of the top five biggest earthquakes in the world ever recorded since 1900, the disaster shifted the very earth itself, moving portions of Japan 7.9 ft closer to North America. Nearly 125,000 buildings were destroyed as a wall of water with waves up to 33 feet high crashed down on an area of approximately 470 square kilometers of cities and farmland along the Japanese coast. Some 300,000 citizens were displaced by the event, and as they huddled in makeshift refugee shelters and tents, a number of the elderly and sick perished as they succumbed to the freezing conditions of the late winter. Even more worrying, the tsunami left a number of nuclear power plants disabled in the wake of the devastation, including the Fukushima Daiichi plant, one of the fifteen largest nuclear power plants in the world. Severe damage to the reactor cooling systems exposed reactor fuel rods, and in the weeks following the plant shutdown there were visible explosions, containment vessel damage, and a partial nuclear meltdown in at least two of its reactors. Officials harbor no illusions — they know they're in for a long fight as they struggle to prevent a full-blown atomic crisis. "We are focusing on establishing the conditions there using every bit of expertise available," Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan said during a visit to the area. "I am convinced we will be able to achieve it. I do not know for now how long this will take." The tragedy brought destruction on such a large scale, even parts of the country that were left unscathed by the wrath of the disaster are feeling the brunt of its impact. Marie Toyama, a 4th year environmental business student at Keio University in Minato, Tokyo, explained that much of the area demolished by flooding was made up of factories and industrial zones that left most of the country without basic necessities. "I don't have any friends or relatives in the Tohoku district where the damage of the earthquake is most serious," Toyama said. "But daily products such as rice, bread, milk, eggs, emergency related products such flashlights, batteries were scarce." But though the earthquake and tsunami claimed many lives, homes and businesses, the disaster revealed the great resilience and determination of the country. Japanese citizens forged on in the days following immediately after the disaster because of a cultural attitude dubbed "gaman," a term that translates to "enduring the seemingly unbearable with patience and dignity." Combined with the country's strong respect for authority during crises, there was little to no looting or widespread chaos in the aftermath, and many countries have recognized the behavior with admiring respect. "I am amazed at how well the Japanese are behaving," said Tang Zhaoxin, a Chinese citizen. "I think we should enhance the quality of our national behavior." Japan has a long road ahead as it begins the process of rebuilding, "In the 65 years after the end of World War II, this is the toughest and the most difficult crisis for Japan," Kan said in a news conference on CNN. No doubt, for both Japan and the world over, the horrific scale of the disaster will stand out in history as a tragedy to be forever etched in memory. News [43]