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Houstonian 2011
News
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24422.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24422

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 2011 - News, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24422.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2011
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title News
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_2011_035.jpg
Transcript Space shuttle Discovery completed more than 30 successful missions, more than any other orbiter in NASA's fleet. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons THE FINAL MISSION After more than 30 trips to outer space, NASA retires space shuttle Discovery By Joshua Siegel After spending 365 days in space over the course of a 27-year career, the space shuttle Discovery has landed for the final time and will now make its home inside the walls of the Smithsonian Institution in Washington, D.C. The shuttle, which completed more successful missions than any other orbiter — 39 — was the first of NASA's fleet to be retired after its final mission was completed with a smooth touchdown at Kennedy Space Center on March 11, 2011. "We wanted to go out on a high note, and Discovery has done it," launch director Mike Leinbach said to the Houston Chronicle. "We couldn't ask for any more. It was virtually a perfect mission." On its final voyage, Discovery dropped off a storage room and a humanoid robotic assistant, Robonaut 2, to the International Space Station. Discovery was the third operational orbiter launched by NASA, following Challenger and Columbia. After the tragedies that befell both of the older shuttles, Discovery flew the "Return to Flight" missions following each. The completion of missions by NASA's two youngest orbiters, Atlantis and Endeavour, will signal the end of the three-decade run of the Space Shuttle program with Discovery being its most prolific shuttle. "We're seeing a program come to a close here, and to see these shuttles, these beautiful, magnificent flying machines, end their service life is obviously a little bit sad for us," Astronaut and M.D. Michael Barratt said to the New York Times. "But it is about time — they've lived a very long time, they've had a fabulous success record." Discovery carried Senator Jake Garn (R-Utah) during its week- long mission to rescue two satellites and launch two others in 1984. It was the first time an incumbent member of Congress travelled into space. Two years after flying the first "Return to Flight" mission, Discovery was again a part of history when it launched the Hubble Space Telescope on April 24, 1990. In 1998, Discovery carried another active senator into space when John Glenn became the oldest human to ever go into space. Glenn had previously travelled to space in 1962 as part of the Mercury Atlas 6 mission; he was the fifth person to ever travel into space. Glenn was 77 years old when he boarded Discovery and helped the space program gain valuable information about how space travel affects individuals of advanced ages. The mission was also the first time a Spaniard traveled to space with astronaut Pedro Duque on board. During its career, Discovery travelled 148,221,675 miles, deployed 31 satellites, docked 13 times at the International Space Station and once with Russian space station Mir. "It is a vehicle the likes of which we won't see again, for probably decades," Barratt said in an interview with ABC News from orbit. "The carrying capacity of this ship, the number of people, the fact that it can be an independent orbiting laboratory or a massive cargo hauler. It can support spacewalks or experimental work and land in a fairly sanguine fashion on a runway. It is an incredible spaceship, so I think we can celebrate that legacy with absolutely no problem, with reckless abandon if you will." [42] inside the Pride