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Houstonian 2011
News
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24420.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24420

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 2011 - News, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24420.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2011
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title News
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_2011_033.jpg
Transcript (left) Crowds amassed in Midan El Tahrir, Cairo during "March of the removal of the Gaddafi regime. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons ons" part of the 2011 Egyptian protests (right) People took to the streets in Libya to demand the WALK LIKE AN EGYPTIAN Revolutions breakout in the Middle East to overturn dictators By Sarah Raslan The Spring of 2011 was a rather busy one, not only on campus but across the world in a place they call the Middle East. When the Tunisian people were able to topple their president of 23 years, Arabs all over the world began to wonder if the same could ever happen in their countries. Most Arabs dismissed it as something that would most likely never happen in their country and that Tunisia was a very rare and beautiful case. Egyptians in Houston discussed the events of Tunisia, wondering if the people of Egypt would ever rise up against the tyrannical regime of Hosni Mubarak, who took power three decades ago. As Egyptians and Arabs all over the world doubted that the revolutionary spirit of Tunisia would spread to Egypt, Egyptian activists were planning and getting ready for a revolution that would capture the world's heart and help the Arab imagination run free. Egyptians took to the streets on Jan. 25, calling for the ousting of Mubarak and yelling chants such as "the people want down with the regime." The peaceful protesters only carried signs, some even handed out flowers to police forces in an attempt to show the police and the world that they were peaceful demonstrators. The next day the demonstrators returned to the streets, breaking a ban on protests, and were met with violence from state security and police. Tear gas, rubber bullets, water cannons and live ammunition were used on the demonstrators in an attempt by the regime to crush the revolution. The protests in Egypt were planned on social media websites such as Facebook and Twitter. By the third day of the revolution, Mubarak shut down Internet in Egypt and cut off cell phone lines, leaving Egypt cut off from the world. Outside supports of the revolution began demonstrations in front of the Egyptian Consulate in their cities to show their solidarity. Over the next two weeks, the demonstrations in Egypt would continue. Mubarak spoke to the people but would not recognize their calls for the end of his rule. This angered the Egyptian people and they continued to protest and fight for their freedom from Mubarak's oppressive regime. As the protests continued, Mubarak formed a "new government" that mostly consisted of the same officials being appointed to different government positions, along with a promise that he and his son would not be running for the office of president in the coming election. Again, the protests continued. On Feb. 11, Mubarak resigned from the presidency and fled Cairo to stay in his Sharm el Sheikh beach house. Egyptians were ecstatic with their accomplishment, overthrowing a 31-year-old regime in 18 days. The world celebrated Egypt's freedom from Mubarak and the revolutions would soon spread to neighboring Libya. The struggle for freedom and democracy in Egypt did not end with Mubarak's resignation and the struggle continues to this day. After witnessing the Egyptian revolution, Libyans took to the streets on Feb. 17 calling for an end to Gaddafi's regime. Thousands of lives have been lost in Libya due to violence from Gaddafi's security and foreign mercenaries, but the Libyan people's spirits are high and have vowed to continue their fight until freedom is on their side. The Arab revolutionary fever has spread all over the region with Syria, Bahrain and Yemen joining the call for freedom and democracy in the Middle East. [40] nside the Pride