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Houstonian 2011
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Houstonian 2011 - News. 2011. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 2, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24414.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2011). Houstonian 2011 - News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24414

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 2011 - News, 2011, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 2, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24414.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2011
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 2011
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 2011, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title News
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_2011_027.jpg
Transcript South Korean Island, Yeonpyeong was the site of an attack by North Korea, which left two people dead, and 10 wounded. Courtesy of Wikimedia Commons TROUBLE IN ASIA North Korea rises alert after bombing of South Korean island, fears of a third world war arise By Zahra Ahmed The bombing of the South Korean island of Yeonpyeong by North Korea worsened an already fragile relationship between the two neighboring Asian countries. The November 23, 2010 attack left two South Korean marines dead and 16 others wounded. South Korea responded by protecting its border with F-16 fighter jets and cutting off all humanitarian assistance with North Korea. Tensions have always ran high between the two nations. After the Korean War, the United Nations Command (Korea) drew up maritime boundaries that were never agreeable to North Korea and post-war frictions between the two were irritated in the 1970s, with violence resuming in the 1980s. Precise motives for the attack cannot be confirmed, but several theories exist. North Korea was jealous of the acclaim that Seoul received after it hosted the G20 just two weeks before the attack. Jealousy over Seoul's success and the military ambitions of North Korea successor Kim Jong Un proved possible motives for the attack. "Kim Jong Un is currently under the influence of more hawkish generals," says Cheong Seong-Chang, a senior fellow at the Sejong Institute, in an article for Time Magazine. "The son's power base is derived from the military, and the power of military is greater than ever." The attack also occcured days after it was learned that North Korea was pressing ahead with its nuclear program. The actions of North Korea were condemned around the globe. "North Korea's indiscriminate artillery attack on Yeonpyeong Island is a clear military provocation on the Republic of Korea," Hong Sang-pyo, senior secretary for public affairs at the presidential office Cheong Wa Dae, said in a statement. "Furthermore, recklessly shelling against civilians can never be tolerated." The U.S., a close ally to the South, also was quick to respond to the attacks. "The United States strongly condemns this attack and calls on North Korea to halt its belligerent action," the White House said in a statement. "The U.S. is firmly committed to the defense of our ally, the Republic of Korea, and to the maintenance of regional peace and stability." World leaders, including Russia and China, feared the worst and asked that the problem be resolved in a peaceful manner. South Korean President Lee Myung-Bak urged officials to "handle it well to prevent further escalation." The violence between the two countries did not worsen after the attack. On January 20, 2011 optimism rose as South Korea accepted military negotiations with North Korea. Plans to discuss recent military provocations, denuclearization and maintenance of peace in regard to territorial disputed waters are on the agenda. In early May 2011, Lee said he was willing to open negotiations for a security summit with Kim, as long as he agreed to abandon nuclear weapons and apologize for the conflicts that occurred last year. [34] Inside the Pride