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Houstonian 2011
News
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 12, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24410.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24410

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 2011 - News, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 12, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24410.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2011
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title News
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_2011_023.jpg
Transcript The world watched as each miner was safely brought back to the surface after spending 69 days trapped 2,300 ft underground. Wikimedia Commons CHILEAN 33 A story that captivated the world and proved that happy endings don't only happen in fairy tales By Sara Nichols After being trapped underground for 69 days, the world watched on Oct. 13 as one by one, Chile's 33 miners emerged from the dark innards of the Earth. The story of each man and their struggle to survive under such harsh conditions captivated the world. Viewers watched for two months as the miners cheered their favorite soccer team, sang the Chilean national anthem and maintained their spirit and moral despite the conditions they faced. Their stories became a symbol of hope and perseverance, a tale that will not be easily forgotten. As each man was lifted out, Chilean President Sebastian Pinera greeted each with a warm embrace. "We had promised to look until we found them," Pinera told CNN on Oct. 14. In Santiago, the Chilean capital, people watched the rescue on a big screen TV set up in a town square and celebrated and wept tears of joy as each miner was lifted up. People also celebrated in Chilean embassies around the world. Pinera was on site nearly every day since the mine first collapsed until the last miner and rescuer was lifted up. It was his presence and commitment to bringing all the miners to surface alive that gave hope and faith to the families and the world that this story would not have a tragic end. "The miners, their families, the rescue workers, the government and all the Chileans have shown unity, strength, faith, hope, that is recognized and admired by the whole world," Pinera told CNN on Oct. 9. "This shows that when Chileans unite for great causes, regardless how grand or ambitious they may seem, we are always able to reach our goals and conquer the highest peaks." The rescue cost the Chilean government between $10-20 million, and Pinera said, "it was all worth it." Psychology senior Kathleen Cole de Gonzalez closely followed the news coverage of both the time during which the miners were trapped and the 22 V£-hour rescue mission to free them. "I can only imagine that it must have been a rollercoaster of emotion going from fear of dying to hopes of rescue and back and forth and everything in between," Cole de Gonzalez said. "I am sure it is an experience they will carry the rest of their lives." As the miners emerged from the bottom of the earth, fears arose as to their physical and emotional well-being. Cole de Gonzalez said there are an infinite number of psychological effects that could result from the miners' time spent in a small, dark shaft 2,300 feet under ground, but a lot depends on the miners' experience, support and environment. She said part of the miner's ability to stay positive and keep faith is connected to the strong family values and traditions in Hispanic cultures, in which these are more important than independence and oneself. "The Chileans are more collectivism I could not say exactly how they must feel or felt," she said. "(But) I do not think an average American could spend 69 days with 32 other people in extremely close quarters without violence." Cole de Gonzalez also said she thinks the connected culture aids with the healing process, because the miners will have more people they can rely on for support — both emotionally and psychologically. "In a collectivist society, people tend to recover faster when they have extreme familial support," she said. "I can only hope that any emotional or physical obstacles are recovered from quickly." After the rescue, the miners have themselves become celebrities, not only in Chile, but also here in America. CNN honored them at its annual Heroes ceremony in November at the Shrine Auditorium in Los Angeles. All the miners walked out on stage to open the ceremony, carrying the Chilean flag and thanking the world for its support and well-wishes. [30] Inside the Pride