Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 2011
News
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 24, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24408.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24408

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 2011 - News, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 24, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24408.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2011
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title News
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_2011_021.jpg
Transcript Family and friends rejoiced as U.S. combat troops began arriving home after President Barack Obama annouced the end of America's combat mission in Iraq. Wikimedia Commons COMING HOME After 7 years of war, Obama ends U.S. combat role, says priority now is nation building at home By Paola Estrada On March 20, 2003, American troops made their way across the border from Kuwait to Iraq in what would be the beginning of a much-disputed war. Seven years later on August 31, 2010, President Barack Obama announced the withdrawal of American combat troops from Iraq, marking the end of America's combat mission in the country. As the president addressed the nation from the Oval Office, the last of the U.S. combat troops were already on their way across the border once more — this time from Iraq to Kuwait. "Operation Iraqi Freedom is over," Obama said. "The Iraqi people now have lead responsibility for the security of their country." Nearly 100,000 troops were ordered out of Iraq following the president's address. Yet roughly 49,700 non-combat troops were left behind to assist and continue to train the Iraqi military, according to an Aug. 31 New York Tmes article. "In the end, only Iraqis can resolve their differences and police their streets," Obama said. "Only Iraqis can build a democracy within their borders. What America can do, and will do, is provide support for the Iraqi people as both a friend and a partner." Obama announced all U.S. troops were to withdraw by the end of 2011. In an address to the Iraqi people, Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al- Maliki echoed Obama's hope for Iraq. "Iraq today is sovereign and independent. With the execution of the troop pullout, our relations with the United States have entered a new stage between two equal, sovereign countries," al-Maliki said. But not everyone was so optimistic. New York Tmes reporter Steven Lee Myers wrote in his blog that pulling out the troops before the Iraqi government was firmly in place was a bad decision. Anthony H. Cordesman, a military specialist at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, wrote in the New York Tmes on Aug. 21, "Political posturing is the norm in Washington, and claiming victory is far more popular than bearing the burden of leadership and dealing with reality. The Iraq war is not over and it is not 'won.' In fact, it is at a critical stage as at any time since 2003." UH student Dan Wilden, an Army veteran of both the Iraq and Afghanistan wars, said "ending" the war was only political doublespeak. "They just pull out the combat troops," he said. "What really happens is now it's a harder fight, and now we are not under the premises of being at war because we no longer have the big threat of saying, 'Hey, if you mess with us we are going to drop the infantry on you. We are going to drop the cavalry on you. We are going to take you out.' Now that's not there anymore. So now you just have this combat support unit that is there ... fighting with their backs against the wall, with one hand tied behind their backs. So the war is not over; it's just over on paper." Overshadowing the announcement of the troop pullout was the news concerning the renewed focus on the war in Afghanistan. In his address, Obama reasserted his plan of maintaining troops in Afghanistan for a limited time only. "As was the case in Iraq, we cannot do for Afghans what they must ultimately do for themselves," he said. For many U.S. soldiers, the news underscored the fact that their homecoming was merely a temporary one. "Everyone knows you are just coming home to go right back out to Afghanistan," Wilden said. [28] Inside the Pride