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Houstonian 2011
News
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24406.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24406

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 2011 - News, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24406.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2011
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title News
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_2011_019.jpg
Transcript The mosque brought the issue of freedom of speech and religion to the center of the debate over the summer months in New York City. David Shankbone/ Wikimedia Commons CHURCH VS. STATE People took to the streets of NYC and around the country over the controversy of an Islamic center being built near Ground Zero By Alexandra Kuchik Since the Sept. 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, the area where the World Trade Center towers once proudly stood has become hallowed ground for mourners, a memorial for the more than 3,000 people who lost their lives that terrible day. As the ninth anniversary of the attacks neared, a heated debate arose in late August 2010 regarding plans to build an Islamic center and mosque blocks away from Ground Zero. The idea of building the mosque was proposed by religious leader Imam Feisal Abdul Rauf and his wife, Daisy Khan. Their plan was to construct a facility similar to a YMCA that would include a theater, pool and mosque, as well as areas for Jewish and Christian worship. Rauf said the project was intended to create understanding. However, opponents claimed the close proximity of an Islamic center to Ground Zero was insensitive and disrespectful to both the victims of the 9/11 attacks and their families. Some family members of 9/11 victims have spoken out against the building proposal. Gila Barzi, who lost her son when the towers fell, told the Associated Press in August that Ground Zero "is sacred ground and it's where my son was buried...(the mosque would be) like a knife in our hearts." Groups like Stop Islamization of America, which has created an online petition to stop construction of the mosque, argue that it is a slap in the face of Americans to allow a symbol of Islamic faith so close to where Americans were killed by Islamic terrorists. But defenders of the mosque include President Barack Obama, who reminded the public that the religion of Islam is not the enemy. "I recognize the extraordinary sensitivities around 9/11," Obama said. "I've met with families of 9/11 victims in the past. I can only imagine the continuing pain and anguish and sense of loss that they may go through. But I go back to what I said earlier: we are not at war against Islam. We are at war against terrorist organizations that have distorted Islam or falsely used the banner of Islam to engage in their destructive acts." Some UH students also stood up in support of the center, citing the freedom of religion guaranteed by the First Amendment. Some speculated that those that oppose the mosque do so because they fear or misunderstand the Muslim faith. "This country allows for the practice of religion freely in our most fundamental governing document," political science senior Matthew Wheeler said. Master of fine arts candidate Dane Wisher shared Wheeler's sentiments, saying that fear is fueling the fire. "The current debate about the Ground Zero mosque — the term itself a misnomer — is representative of a dumbing-down of the public," Wisher said. "There is no rational debate occurring, only an opportunistic rhetoric of fear on one side and indignation on the other side, a side struggling for the words to respond to a group of people who will not listen thoughtfully or responsibly." In a Sept. 8 interview with CNN's Soledad O'Brien, Rauf said he was willing to consider changing the location of the mosque but warned that such action could be misconstrued. "The headlines in the Muslim world will be that Islam is under attack," he said. "If you don't do this right, anger will explode in the Muslim world." Plans for construction of the Islamic Center have continued. [26] inside the Pride