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Houstonian 2011
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Houstonian 2011 - News. 2011. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 3, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24405.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2011). Houstonian 2011 - News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24405

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 2011 - News, 2011, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 3, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24405.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 2011
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 2011
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 2011, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
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Title News
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  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_2011_018.jpg
Transcript Rice students and alumni alike were not shy about showing their discontent for Rice administrators selling KTRU to UH. Courtesy of John Grungy Gladu UNPOPULAR DEAL Rice and UH administrators went under fire as many alumni from both universities contested the sale of KTRU By Jack Wehman Listeners of student-run radio station KTRU were dealt a setback when Rice University announced the sale of its radio station to UHon Aug. 16,2010. Rice students and alumni where not shy to let the university administrators know of their discontent; hundreds took to protesting and petitions to prevent the sale from taking place. The KTRU student staff went as far as seeking legal counsel from a Washington D.C based law firm, Paul Hastings Law Firm, to combat the sale. "Student broadcasting is non-commercial radio. It's something that's supposed to be an educational experience," KTRU Station Manager Joey Yang told The Daily Cougar. "It's a public service we do out of pure altruism and the fact that all that has to be sacrificed for a few million dollars, in my mind, is tragic." The new acquisition also received some opposition from UH students and alumni, this was mostly due at the secrecy of the deal between the two universities and the price the University paid for KTRU, particularly during hard economic times, when UH administrators had to lay off staff and professors. A group of UH alumni began an online petition condemning UH administrators for the way they handled the deal. The petition states the "process never allowed for student input or a public discussion of the important issues involved in this permanent change to the Houston radio landscape. We urge UH to re-evaluate their decision and to restore openness and transparency to the university administration." At a UH Board of Regents meeting in November, Rice alumnus Nick Cooper told Regents they should "be ashamed at the way the situation was handled." Numerous UH students spoke to the Regents in KTRU's defense as well. But Rice President David Leebron told the Thresher in their Aug.27 issue that the confidentiality of the sale was necessary. "You talk to anybody in business and they'll tell you about the importance of confidentiality in executing a transaction like this," Leebron. "But people who say you should never behave like a business have no clue what the complexity of the university is about." UH officials did not let the controversy stop them from the deal they said would bring the University one step closer to becoming a Tier-1 institution; and in October the two universities finalized the deal for $9.5 million, pending approval from the Federal Communications Commission. In a Aug. 17 press release, UH President Renu Khator said, "The acquisition of a second public radio station delivers on our promise to keep UH at the forefront of creating strong cultural, educational and artistic opportunities that benefit students and the city of Houston. According to the business plan provided to the Board of Regents, KUHF, the current UH radio station, "will service 100 percent of the debt from fundraising through the community." And the University plans to take on a 20-year tax exempt bond to fund the new station. KUHF would take over KTRU's FM signal and broadcast tower. The station would be renamed KUHC, and would play classical music 24 hours a day. KUHF would then make 88.7, its original frequency, a 24-hour news station. The protests were in some ways successful — KTRU will continue broadcasting both online and on the Pacifica network's alternate HD Radio station. News [25]