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Houstonian 2011
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24403.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2011 - News. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24403

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 2011 - News, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24628/show/24403.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2011
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title News
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_2011_016.jpg
Transcript Volunteers and Gulf Coast residents worked tirelessly to help save the wildlife affected by the BP oil spill. Wikimedia i OIL OVERBOARD Black gold infested the waters of the Gulf Coast and changed the lifes of residents and wildlife for years to come By Jack Wehman On April 20, 2010, British Petroleum changed the world when the Deepwater Horizon oil rig suffered a blowout, killing 11 men. The blowout ruptured a pipeline located more than 3 miles below the Gulf of Mexico — and oil poured out for almost 3 months before the spill was finally contained on July 15. The blown well eventually became the largest accidental spill in history — the US government's final estimate for the spill was 5 million barrels of oil. And although the spill was a tragedy, BP's seemingly never-ending public relations fiasco continued to antagonize the public during the months that oil flowed incessantly. No man was in the spotlight more than BP CEO Tony Hayward, who was eventually removed from his position due to his responses to the disaster. "I think the environmental impact of this disaster is likely to have been very, very modest," Hayward said in an interview with Sky Television. He also said "The Gulf of Mexico is a very big ocean" and that the amount of oil and other chemicals was "tiny" compared to the amount of water in the Gulf. In January 2011, the National Commission on the BP Deepwater Horizon Spill and Offshore Drilling released its nearly 400-page statement on what exactly caused the blowout. It found that BP, Halliburton and Transocean had all disregarded key safety elements — and that the disaster would not have happened if the companies had followed proper procedure. For those along the Gulf Coast that were hit by the spill, though, liability and blame come second to the loss of a job. "This is the worst possible thing that could happen to the Mississippi Gulf Coast," Mississippi resident Louis Skrmetta said in an April 29, 2010 Houston Chronicle report. "It will wipe out the oyster industry. Shrimping wouldn't recover for years. It would kill family tourism. That's our livelihood." In response to the spill, BP created a $20 billion fund to be used to clean up the Gulf. So far fishermen, tourism-based industries and wildlife preservation agencies have accessed nearly $2 billion of the funds. Even the money was not enough for some. Rep. Pete Olson, R-Sugar Land, said the account is basically a "privately funded, government slush fund that the administration is going to divvy out as they see fit," in a Houston Chronicle story. The biggest problem of all, though, is the giant cloud of oil that still looms beneath the ocean's surface. "By dispersing the oil at depths, you create smaller globules of oil and it makes the oil more likely to be affected by even the slow moving currents," said James Cowan, a professor of oceanography at Louisiana State University. "We just don't know where it is, and we don't know where it is going." News [23]