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Houstonian 2010
Contents and Features
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2010 - Contents and Features. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 21, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24018/show/23758.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2010 - Contents and Features. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24018/show/23758

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 2010 - Contents and Features, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 21, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/24018/show/23758.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 2010
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Contents and Features
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_2010_005.jpg
Transcript WDUCATIONPWWPTION * id forifagship status becomes main endeavor for UH President Renu Khator By Darlene Campos THE UNIVERSITY'S PUSH FOR top-tier research status set the tone for UH President Renu Khator's fall and spring agenda. Before a crowd of students, faculty, staff, regents, alumni and community members, Khator outlined UH's progress toward achieving its goal of flagship status during her fall address on Nov. 3 at Moores Opera House. "Our goals are simple — education, innovation, and impact. In good times or in bad, we do not have the luxury of negotiating these goals," Khator, who took the helm as UH's 13th president and the System's eighth chancellor in January of 2009, said. Khator recognized the passage of Proposition 4 as a major feat for higher education in Houston and an important step for UH's bid in becoming Texas' next flagship university along with University of Texas in Austin, Texas A&M University in College Station and Rice University. "That day was a defining moment for the city of Houston," she said. "That day was the day we began the most important stage on our journey toward tier one." The amendment, which passed on Nov. 3, grants $500 million to fund research at emerging public universities in Texas — a move Khator said would aid UH in its endeavor to compete on a national level. While UH was one of only seven Texas universities eligible to receive Proposition 4 research funds, UH must still meet five out of the seven requirements before reaching flagship status. These criteria include the awarding of at least 200 doctorate degrees per academic year and garnering at least a $400 million endowment. A university must meet these two priority requirements before receiving any sponsorship for research studies. "Now that (Proposition 4) has passed we must start the hard work," she said. "We must meet the criteria by the state Legislature to become a nationally competitive research university." Along with increased research initiatives, UH will focus on ensuring students' academic success in the coming years. Although fall enrollment reached a record- breaking 37,000, Khator said a university's success depends heavily on the graduation rates of its students. "On our quest to become tier one, we will be judged not just by how many students we enroll, but also by how many we graduate," she said. To ensure the academic success of its students, the University will, in the coming years, work with high schools to ready students for four-year universities, secure private donations for student success and offer more efficient campus services. Khator also stressed the scope of UH's innovative centers of learning and research. In its yearly Top American Research Universities report, the Center for Universi- Main fagade of the Ezekiel W. Cuiien Building. | Gabriel Pastrano Our goals are simple — education, innovation, and impact. In good times or in bad, we do not have the luxury of negotiating these goals. - UH President Renu Khator ty Performance recognized assistant professor of computer science Edgar Gabriel, assistant professor of chemistry Vassiliy Lubchenko, associate professor of chemistry Olafs Daugulis, associate professor of history Xiaoping Cong, and associate professor of communication Fred Schiff for outstanding research in their respective fields. This fall, the UH System Board of Regents approved $240 million in renovations and new construction projects that will expand centers for academic research and collaboration among the arts on campus. UH purchased 74 acres of land, creating the UH Energy Research Park and became an official member institution of the Texas Medical Center. With the help of UH's Phi Beta Kappa faculty, a proposal was submitted to establish a Phi Beta Kappa chapter in the Association of Research Libraries to allow UH to climb higher on the flagship ladder. ■ UH TRADITIONS Part of being a flagship institution means offering students a university in which its traditions are as rich as its education. Thoughout the years UH has adopted many traditions including the singing of its Alma Mater and the Cougar Fight Song at football games. Here are the stories behind some of UH's oldest traditions. OFFICIAL COLORS The official colors of UH are Scarlet and Albino White. The University adopted the colors in 1938 at the same time the UH seal was adopted. Scarlet symbolizes two things: the blood that is the life source of the soul and the actions of Sir Hugh, whose timely actions saved a royal bloodline — in other words, courage and perseverance. Albino White symbolizes the purity and perfections of a heart, mind and soul that is dedicated to faithful service; it also represents compassion and helping others. COUGAR MASCOT The mascot of the University has been a cougar since 1927. The mascot was selected by our then Professor John W. Bender. Coach Bender joined the faculty after having served as the Head Football Coach at Washington State University. During his tenure at Washington State, he became fond of the WSU mascot (a cougar). When he arrived here, the students were looking for a name for the student newspapers (the school's first extracurricular activity). He suggested that they call the newspaper the Cougar because of the grace, power and pride that the Cougar embodies. The name was unanimously agreed upon. From that time on, all University of Houston student groups and activities have been associated with Cougars. We may well be the only university in the U.S. to name its athletic teams after the student newspaper. UH SEAL The Official Seal of arms of General Sam Houston, as handed down to him from noble ancestors. The simple escutcheon in the center of the seal consists of checkered chevrons denoting nobility, and three Martlets, gentle Lowland birds symbolizing peace and deliverance. A winged hourglass is above the shield and surmounting this, the motto, "In Tempore" (In Time). Greyhounds were placed at the sides to indicate the speed in giving aid. The seal was adopted by UH in 1938 in conjunction with the construction of the campus. The first official version was placed on the floor of the Roy Cuiien Building. Source: www.uh.edu 4 • Features Features • 5