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Houstonian 2008
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2008 - Community. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/23360/show/23302.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 2008 - Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/23360/show/23302

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 2008 - Community, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/23360/show/23302.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2008
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Community
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_2008_160.jpg
Transcript Turkicfest 2007 On September 8th and 9th, Houston hosted the first Turkic festival in Texas. The event had 7,000 people come to celebrate Turkey's rich culture and heritage. The city of Houston showed its warm hospitality as people from different parts of the world united to commemorate the culture. The festival featured performances from an Ottoman military band, The Ayna Band, a popular Turkic pop/rock group), authentic Turkic folk dancers, showcasing Turkey's numerous cultures and a shadow theatre. Booths offered hand craftsman calligraphy; ceramic arts and costumes were also available for purchase. Ottoman military bands referred to as mehters are believed to be the oldest type of military bands in the world. The whole concept of military bands began in the 16th century Ottoman Empire. A typical mehter consists of customary instruments such as boru (trumpet), nakare (small kettledrum), kos (large bass drum), cevgen (stick bearing small bells), kaba zurna (bass variety of the zurna), and the davul (frame drum). The bands usually dress in colorful costumes, including long robes wrapped in silk and high ribbed hates. To modern-day Turks, Ottoman bands are viewed as part of Turkey's imperial history and embody heroism. Turkic dancers perform at a vast number of events; weddings, religious festivals, sending young men off to the military; and victory celebrations are just a few examples. These dancers are respectable people who have an aptitude for the region's music and folk dances that they perform in. Folk dances vary by occasion, but generally deal with daily life, natural events, social events, stories, and matters of the heart. In addition, dances are usually name after geographic regions, their creators or the stories they relate to. In historicTurkey, weddings were lager spectacle, which spanned several days. The average wedding ceremony consisted of a procession to the bridegroom's house, bridal-bath and henna-party. At the henna part, the bride and womenfolk of her future husband would dress up in opulent dresses called bindalli; a sequined red veil would cover the bride's face. Once everyone had assembled, llie bride's future mother-in law would roll out a silk cloth. The bride would then approach her while songs were sung in the background and fruity trays appeared. As a sign of good luck and abundance, the bride would receive a gold coin from her mother- in-law. A woman who was happily married had the job of tinging the bride's palms, big toes and fingertips with henna; unmarried friends of I he bride would also receive this tinging in hopes t hat they too find a groom. The Turkish Shadow Theatre's feature, 'Karazog' showcased puppets 35-40 centimeters high, made from camel and water buffalo hides. Shadow play, itself, was introduced to public and private venues in the 17th century but 'Karazog' was performed in 14th century at the Ottoman palace. Story by Kristin Red dock 230 (Ottoman miliiarv bands perfom in front of a crowd. They represented the colors olTurkev in their COS- tumes. Photo byReem Chughtai \ participant fashions the outfit of a Turkish Prince. \ black robe with gold emrboiderj and a matching gold turban. 1*1 ioto byReem ( 'hughtai «""!!!!!! muni"111 .HiiiiiimmM III ■■■■»■■' tmmmmm\ HUH"" IIIIIIIIIIIIII111111 i itiiiiiii'iaiHH" «■■■■ ,.,iii Hill unit Women sal in groups while preparing hot their guests al the festival. Photo b\ Reem Chughtai The crowd enjoys performances b) the (Ottoman Military Band outside (lit} Hall. Photo byReem t 'hughtai 231