Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Download Folder

0 items

Houstonian 1989
Issues
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22594.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22594

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1989 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22594.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1989_270.jpg
Transcript These numbers seem clearly in favor of nuclear energy's useage. But, one problem that has not been addressed is that of nuclear energy's waste products. Idaho Governor Cecil Andrus, a former Secretary of the Interior, found a way to deal with the influx of other states' nuclear waste products. He ordered state police to stop any shipments of nuclear wastes from military or civilian reactors from entering the state. According to an article in the October 31, 1988 issue of Time magazine, "Since 1952 some 75 percent of the defense industries' low level radioactive brew has been depositied in 120,000 drums and 11,000 boxis on a 'temporary' basis at the Idaho National Engineering Labratory, waiting for a new federal Waste Isolation pilot plant near Carlsbad, New Mexico, to open." posal, the French have been no more successful than we. Any solution one nation finds for this major problem will quickly be handed over to every nuclear — powered nation on the globe. Solutions to atomic energy's disposal problems and generation safety problems is a constant concern of not only the average citizen but scientist the world over. The "hottest" idea, that would solve a lot of problems in nuclear energy has been around for millions of years — FUSION! Fussion is the process which the Sun opperates on. Instead of splitting atoms to derive energy for heat, atoms are fused together. There is no radioactive waste to contend with, and no need to refuel. The only problem — the heat generated by fussion is so great that no substance known to man can contain the The problem of nuclear waste is one not only for today, but our long- range future. Critics of nuclear energy are quick to point out that the U.S. has generated thousands of metric tons of "HOT" debris. Enough high and low level nuclear waste has been generated, according to them, that a football field could be piled 300 feet thick. This is not a prob- lem to be taken lightly. Even with government regulation, radioactive waste has ended up in community dumpsites and other non-liscensed waste sites. The U.S. is not alone in this problem. Other nations like France, have been experimenting with a molten glass/nuclear waste combination that they hope will allow the residual heat to escape. But as for actual sites of dis- BUILDING A BETTER NUKE Standard water-cooled reactor Proposed gas-cooled reactor Unless it is cooled by constantly circulating water, the fuel in the single large reactor can melt into an uncontrollable mass Nuclear^vfifip^ reactor 7lfi! \building Four separate reactor units v^ use fuel in such small -- quantities'that it cannot melt down under any circumstances Reactor building To guard against cooling failures, the plant is equipped with multiple sets of bafckup pipes, valves andgenerators^ In the event of a power failure or mechanical problem, the j, ; helium gas will continue to^ cool theTeactoSnibact Solid uranium fuel is packed in long metal rods that can melt at high temperatures, releasing deadly radiation TIME Diagram by Joe Lertola Ura^K fueljffl Grains of fuel too small to ~ Jv; reach temperatures higher/^ than 3,000°F are encapsulated in ceramic spheres that can • withstand 3,300° Fuel container Uranium Coating reaction. As other areas of energy generation are explored, Americans like the rest of the world look for what the future holds. For now, we see fossil fuels polluting our world and wait for radiation to seep into our drinking water. And we continue to demand more and cheaper electricity — regardless of the long run damage it causes. What ever the future holds for us, is yet to be seen. Let us pray that it is a future where children can run and play in a green sunny world void of the harm we have brought on ourselves. ► Wm. Allen Manning. TIME, JANUARY 2, 1989 Nuclear Energy ■ 319