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Houstonian 1989
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 17, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22592.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22592

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1989 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 17, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22592.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1989_268.jpg
Transcript issued to STNP three months after TMI's problem began — not for the same reasons but because "voids" were discovered in reactor complex configurations. The problem rectification was slow in com- ming. But, as soon as it was corrected other problems began to surface. Irregularities in welds had to be corrected, another stop work was ordered. This chain of problem/error and correction, continued throughout all fases of construction. As the plant began testing, reports of miss- management and safety violations took on a new meaning for near-by residents. Houston Lighting and Power, operating as the Project Manager, moved to quiet some fears by handing out some 1,000 Tone Alert Radios to homes within a ten mile radius of the plant. The radios accompanied sirens that were installed in all communities within a ten mile radius of the plant. All of these devices are early warning devices for the surrounding populace in the event an emergency arises. Of the numerous allegations surfacing throughout the construction — most dealt with minor safety violations such as the "Failure of security employees in a watchperson class to have the required high school diploma or equivalent;" others were much more serious. Some problems detailed in a NRC report dated March 8, 1988, cite the seriousness of problems at STNP. The NRC cited Houston Lighting and Power for "inadequate vital area barriers, "which in the event of an accident, prevent radiation from escaping into the atmosphere." Also noted in the report was the failure of STNP to provide and/or utilize proper personnel identification techniques. Noted in the report is the improper use of a computer monitoring system to check personnel movements, and inadequate testing of electronic intrusion devices. Joe Gilliland, NRC spokesman, explained that The average natural radiation background by state — and its sources. the securtiy problems were not serious but could become a nagging problem if not corrected — and the company could be fined. Gilliland added that none of the deficiencies could be explained in greater detail because of the threat to plant security. Documents in the plant's on site library al- ledge that all defeciencies have been corrected. But, the question remains: How safe is Nuclear energy and can we rely on it to supply our needs for years to come without it killing us slowly? Soviets are asking the same questions of their nuclear plants. But, they didn't begin to question the dangers of nuclear energy until a major meltdown occured at their Chernobyl Nuclear plant. Better than 300,000 people by soviet reports, have been affected by the nuclear plume that drifted over the Soviet Republic of Byelorussia and the Ukraine. But they were not the only ones that suffered from exposure. Sweden was the first European nation to expose the disaster, and the first to realise the danger. The Laplanders, a nomadic people in Sweden, live off the land. The contamination from radiation has been recorded in milk from their herds and in their crops. While others were concerning themselves with the direct implications from the accident, the Soviets were looking inwardly to find out why it happened and what took so long for it to be reported. Their problem was simular to TMI, but progressed beyond the simple release of radioactive steam. Faulty equipment and ill-trained personnel are no excuse for a three day delay in reporting the accident to a nuclear-fearing world. Fear of another atomic accident almost completely stopped the nuclear industry in America. Learning from past mistakes, scientist have begun construction on new types of reactors and nuclear plants. Most of the new ideas are _ .6% Fallout 0.5% Miscellaneous sources 0.45% Occupational exposure 0.15% Releases from the nuclear industry Nuclear Energy ■ 317