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Houstonian 1989
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 27, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22583.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22583

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1989 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 27, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22583.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1989_259.jpg
Transcript Abortion: A Campus Perspective; A Personal Perspective The Daily Cougar's letters to the editor have carried many views on many subjects throughout the the years, and have encapsulated yet another controversial subject. Dear Editor, "Congratulations to Pamela Wilson for exposing the hypocritical policies of the radical feminists. Truth is like cream, it always rises to the top, and it was only a matter of time before their pro- abortion agenda was exposed for what it is — discrimination." Maybe it is the convoluted thinking of the feminists that Pam so clearly pointed out that is driving women away from the radical feminists positions in droves. It is precisely because women can think clearly that conservative women's organizations, such as Concerned Women of America, a pro- family organization led by Beverly LaHaye, has four times as many members as NOW. The abortion issue is a civil rights issue. It has nothing to do with a woman's right to "choose," for that choice was made when she became sexually involved (pregnancy from rape and incest account for less than 5 percent of abortions). The question is, when does human life begin? If the baby in her womb is a human, then she has no right to "choose" to kill it. The burden of proof falls on the pro-abortions to produce evidence that the baby is not a human. Until all reasonable doubt is removed, we should take the side of life. If the pro-abortionists are so sure the fetus is not alive in the mother's womb, why do they oppose laws that would only require doctors to give women contemplating an abortion all the facts about the procedure, the fetus and the alternatives available? This is done for every other type of surgical procedure and is only common sense. It would be ludicrous for a doctor not to be able to tell the patient the possible dangers and side effects of a surgical procedure, and yet this is exactly what the feminists demand. The end of slavery and civil rights for blacks did not come easily. The pro- life movement is committed and growing stronger every day. We in the pro- life movement will never, never, never stop fighting until unborn babies have equal protection under the law. Tom Brouwer, Sr., History Dear Editor, I am responding to several letters recently printed concerning abortion and adoption. All of them were obviously written by people who have experienced neither. As a teenager, I became pregnant and gave up my son for adoption. No one knows the guilt, pain and anger a woman who relinquishes her child goes through. It's great to say "the woman should pay for her mistake," but what about the man? Most young men are not held accountable for their actions in cases like these. Also, what teenage boy can afford to take that type of responsibility? Who will feed, clothe, educate and provide medical care for these young women? In my case, I was fortunate to have supportive parents who could afford to take care of my medical expenses. When later in my life I became pregnant (even though using "reliable" birth control at the time), I decided to have an abortion, for several reasons. First, I couldn't go through the pain of losing another child, no matter how unplanned, again. Also, I couldn't financially support a child by myself. One of the writers commented that hugs and kisses were free, but believe me, diapers and formula and child care aren't. Unlike the writer, who seems to believe that the feeding, clothing and caring for a child is easily done, I have seen the result of unplanned pregnancies where the children were loved but neglected because the parents couldn't afford to care for them properly. Are all of these anti-abortionists going to personally contribute to the caring of these children? Probably just as much as they would open their home to an un wed mother, who is plan ning to place her child up for adoption, and pay for her medical care. Finally, I would like to say that I do not regret go ing through my first pregnancy and releasing my child. I know that my son is loved and well-cared for; financially, emotionally, spiritually. However, theri» is not one day that I do not think of him and miss him and feel guilty that I could not provide for him. The pain never goes away, and it doesn't dull with time. If "pro-lifers" want to criticize the women who have had abortions, let them instead do something about it by giving emotional, financial and moral support to a pregnant teer., and help her to make the hardest — and the best — decision of her life. And one more thing: Teach your kids about responsible sex at an early age. Telling them to say no is not always effective. I should know: I learned about it the hard way. Mary Tate, Alumna Class of '88 Even though we're moving into a new dec ade and leaving behind the 80s, the issue of abortion will travel with us. Surrounded by controversy and with the Roe v. Wade decision up for review, look for the abortion issue to continue to dominate many a heated debate in the years to come. 308 ■ Issues