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Houstonian 1989
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 10, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22578.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22578

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1989 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 10, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22578.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1989_254.jpg
Transcript New horizons dawning at I Men have always peered to the heavens with breathless curiosity. It is a part of human nature to question the unknown. The United States looked to the sky with horror and an eerie feeling of disbelief in wake of the vivid 1986 Challenger accident. Our nation had seemingly lost a crucial edge in space, an unblemished record in manned-flight, and a vigorous launch schedule. Six astronauts and a civilian teacher, tragically lost their lives. The city of Houston, the place N.A.S.A. calls home, was equally if not more devastated than the nation. The road to 1988 and a revitalized space program was a long and difficult one. The launch of Discovery in September 1988 and the secret launch of Atlantis in December 1988 set the wheels in motion for space exploration and renewed our confidence. The country, the city of Houston, and our very own University of Houston stand to benefit from America's return to space. America's return to space will allow N.A.S.A. to continue a shuttle program which includes seven manned space flights for 1989, initiate new unmanned exploration programs and to continue development of the space station which N.A.S.A. views as the cornerstone of future efforts to re-explore the moon or to journey to the red planet. The nation will benefit from these continued programs scientifically, commercially, and from a military point of view. We tax payers hope to see some benefits associated with a 13 billion dollar space program! The city of Houston is looking at a fantastic future as home to N.A.S.A. and the Johnson Space Center. This promising future is highlighted in two areas; first, upcoming space voyages and a space station will create a need for elbow room in the mission control center and a training facility for space station-bound astronauts. Assuming congress approves this could create up to 1000 jobs in the Houston area and secondly, Walt Disney Imagineering has teamed up with the Johnson Space Center to create SPACE CENTER HOUSTON! The design schematics of Space Center Houston, published by the Manned Space Flight Foundation, Inc. in September 1988, envision a 140,000 square foot, two-leveled dome-topped building capable of allowing 6,500 visitors per hour to be "insiders" at SCH through a day of experiences, live coverage of ongoing missions, large format film and video, historical exhibits and a tour of behind-the-scenes action led by a special breed of guides who are knowledgeable spokesmen. Admission is expected to cost about $5.00 per person and the Foundation predicts two million people will visit Space Center Houston in the first twelve months after opening day in early 1991. Space Center Houston will not be a museum or a theme park, but an experience center challenging your senses, your emotions, your intellect, and your immagination. Two million adventure-seeking visitors will provide an economic boost to Houston in 1991 as will the jobs created by building Space Center Houston. Disney Imagineering and the Johnson Space Center needed expert advice on how to handle food and beverage operations and service for such a large facility as SPC. They chose the University of Houston. Overseeing all of this and acting as director is Dr. F.H. "Ted" Wasky representing the Conrad Hilton College. Planned are two restaurants, one with a wait staff and the other fast-food style. According to Albert Mertz, a senior at the Conrad Hilton College, "The restaurant will be able to serve 10,000 visitors per day." Included in a proposal submitted to N.A.S.A. and Disney are all the various functions of a large scale food and beverage operation, such as: issuing and receiving, accounting duties, security, storage areas, cleaning lines and arrang- ment of foods to name a few. The bottom line is that a major attraction center, which involves millions of dollars and years of planning, will be built in Houston. The hierarchy of N.A.S.A. and Disney Imagineering have placed a tremendous amount of confidence in the Conrad Hilton College by asking for their cooperation and advice. This directly enhances the school's image and credibility. As UH students and alumni, with a little coercion we may get a discount on admission to Space Center Houston with our ID cards. ► The shuttle Discovery blasted into orbit in September, the first space flight since the shuttle Challenger mission ended tragically 73 seconds after liftoff on Jan. 28, 1986. The Discovery ended its successful four day 1.6 million mile mission with a triumphant landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Photo Courtesy AP Space ■ 303