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Houstonian 1989
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22571.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22571

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1989 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22571.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1989_247.jpg
Transcript Chu The Man 6 i • espite working 12-hour shifts everyday in his laboratory and being constantly encircled by spectometers, beakers and test tubes, internationally — famed UH physicist Dr. Ching-Wu Paul Chu says he is still in touch with reality. Wearing a light blue shirt with tattered blue jeans and a pair of discolored brown suede shoes, Chu says his notoriety hasn't changed his lifestyle or values any. It has merely made him less egotistical he says. "Basically, I'm still the same old person wearing the same dirty coats," Chu says with a laugh. "But now, I can no longer be as selfish as I used to. Now, I have to give time to the community at large." In December, 1986, Chu announced to his colleagues that he was on the threshold of something big. He told them he had significantly raised superconducting temperatures above their existing levels. In later months, he reported surpassing his earlier accomplishment, which made Chu a celebrity. Discovered in 1911 by Dutch scientist Heike Onnes, superconductivity is the ability to transport electrical current at increased temperatures with no resistance. But until Chu's advancements, scientists had made minimal progress. They had only been successful in raising the temperatures at which superconductivitity occurs by 19 degrees — to 23 degrees from 4 degrees Kelvin. Chu, however, succeeded in raising temperatures as high as 98 degrees from 4 degrees Kelvin. "I try not to change," he says, "because my hope is that no one will remember me as a bastard." Born in Hunan, China in 1941, Chu says he initially wanted to become a physicist because the Chinese government encouraged it. "The I try not to change/' he says, 1'because my hope is that no one will remember me as a. bastard." days when I grew up, the economic conditions in China were quite bad, and so many of the young kids were told that the way to get the country rich was to go into science," he says. But it wasn't until he and his family moved to Taiwan in his early childhood that his own personal interest in science developed. After receiving a bachelor of science degree from Chenkung University in 1962, he decided to continue his training. However, his plans were interupted when he was drafted into the Nationalist Chinese air force. But after serving one year in the military as a second lieutenant, he emigrated to the United States to attend Fordham University in the Bronx. "I came as a foreign student for education because I felt I could do more in this country," Chu says. In 1974, he received his citizenship. A forerunner for the 1987 Nobel Prize in physics, Chu says he first began his superconductivity research 24 *years ago, when he was a graduate student at the University of California in San Diego. He says he was interested in superconductivity because it presented him with a challenge. "It was an intellectual challenge because it has some very exciting problems, which to understand them takes a lot of effort. It's like a puzzle. Then it has quick, technological potential because if you can get the temperature high enough, you can make use of this material for different purposes." Loose papers, books and manuscripts cover the floors and tops of his desks. Bookshelves burst open with knowledge, standing as a monument for Chu's dedication and persistence. Although it took almost a quarter of a century for his hard work to pay off, Chu says he never felt like giving up. "Three years ago I told my group that this is a 296 ■ Issues