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Houstonian 1989
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Houstonian 1989 - Issues. 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 31, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22567.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989). Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22567

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1989 - Issues, 1989, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 31, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22567.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1989
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1989, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1989_243.jpg
Transcript Remembering how it was like In 1969 and early into the 70's, two wars were ripping away at the mind and soul of America. One, half a world away, the other faught in the living rooms, streets and campuses of our country. Both wars produced weapons that inflicted physical and mental wounds on their combatents. We watched helplessly as our nightly news brought the violence home to us. We watched as brother killed brother, generation faught generation, the very fiber of this nation was being torn to shreds. Here at UH it was impossible to get a seat in the TV-rooms, "people would stand in the halls straining to hear the latest report on President Nixon, the war or civil rights issues." "Now you only see students in the TV rooms trying to keep up on their soaps." "Students have no understanding of the intensity of the late sixties and early seventies, I find myself having to create the images of the past in my classes when we discuss the civil rights movement or the Viet Nam War." Sound familiar. It should if you had Dr. Robert A. Carp, professor and pre-law advisor with UH's political science department. Carp was a professor during the turbulent era of the 60's amd early 70's, and as he remembers only Prof. Carp — 1969 about 15 percent of the entire student population — with the prodding of the local media — made u; UH's anti-war movement. The balance of UH's population, according t: Carp, lived off campus and had work and family t: occupy their time. "They were caught up in jusl living their day to day lives, so even 1 they didn't agree with the war, theii feelings weren't strong enough to force them to speak out." In retrospect, Carp says, "We were ^| lucky here at UH, in that we were iso lated from the major world focus. There was, however some true convictions about the issues at hand." It's just thct many people looking back see it as youthful rebellion for the sake of rebellion. To others the actions in that era occured because it was socially accep - able to have a cause. There has been a change in the thinking of UH students, the average student no longe r takes on political issues with the same fever they did in the 60's. In fact, according to Carp,"Many black as well as white students feel that the civil rights movement was someone elses cause a generation ago." Carp delt with civil rights issues in class. He remembers having to call several members of hs The Rodriquez family volunteered these photo's so that we might see through the eye's of one who was there. The photographer died, long after the war's end. His were wounds, like many who fought in Viet Nam,that never healed. The scars of this dirty little war will linger long after the last soldier has gone, long after the last family has endured a tweny-one gun salute and taps . •. God forbid we ever allow our young men and women to die on foriegn soil without just cause.