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Houstonian 1989
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22565.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22565

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1989 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22565.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1989_241.jpg
Transcript International efforts are under way to reduce Nuclear weapons. Recent Super-power summits have shown some progress with the elimination of an entire class of nuclear ready missiles. How ever the world's safety can not be determined by east- west negotiations or by effective and verifiable agreements on arms control. Unfortunately, access to nuclear, chemical, and biological weapons is rapidly becoming wide open to forces in the Third World that cannot be controlled by either one of the superpowers. It's just a matter of time till proliferation of such weaponry becomes a tangible threat to the populations of both countries. It may be disconcerting enough to think that Moamar Qaddafi or the Ayatollah Khomeini may acquire such weaponry. It is just as disturbing to think that a group of Afghan guerrillas may feel justified to settle a score with the Soviets by hurling a poison gas bomb at Saratov or Novosibirsk. The basic premise of American nuclear strategy was always based on assumption that there will be no nuclear war as long as the United States had the capability to withstand the first strike and retain sufficient retaliatory power. The main question of the US strategic planning, therefore, was how to survive the first strike. A part of the answer was to avoid placing all strategic eggs in one basket: if the Soviets were able to knock out America's land- based missiles, there should be sufficient strategic power left, whether on land, sea, or in the air, to deliver the retaliatory strike. The assumption that mutual assured destruction(MAD) was a dependable deterrent, underlied the arms control agreements of n u Whose Move Is It? 1970's. It was assumed that as soon as one side developed an adequate defense capability, the other would reciprocate by upgrading its offensive systems, and making such defense obsolete. The 1972 Strategic Arms Limitations Talks (SALT) agreements limited the number of launchers of the offensive strategic missiles. The Anti-Ballistic Missile (ABM) treaty restricted each side's ability to protect its launchers and populations. The SALT-ABM agreeements reflected the technological reality of the time. The state of the art in military technology had its political ramifications worldwide. Since the Second World War, the basis of the NATO alliance was the doctrine of Collective Security which made the retaliatory nuclear power of the United States a quarantor of status quo on the European continent. The US nuclear umbrella was deemed suf ficient to assure against the Soviet preponderance in conventional forces. In the mid-1970's, the Soviets deployed in the Western part of the Soviet Union an arsenal of the SS-20 intermediate range nuclear missiles with the potential target range covering the entire Western Europe. NATO, in December, 1979, replied by announcing the deployment in Europe of 108 American Pershing l\ missiles. The purpose of the announcement was to protect the! credibility of the U.S. nuclear del terrent, defeat the appeasement- like efforts of the "peace movements," and dispell the isolatior.-I ist fears in Western Europe. The message of the proposed deployment was unequivocal: if the United States was prepared to deploy its nuclear arsenal in Europe, it was equally committed to use its home based missiles. Credibility of the doctrines of Collective Security and Mutual Assured Destruction, however, was solely dependent on America's ability to maintain a survival second strike capability at home; the latter, soon enough, had become questionable at best In the late 1970's, the arrrs race entered a new more dange r- ous stage, when the Soviets had substantially reinforced and re duced vulnerability of their silos and deployed a new arsenal of Intercontinental Ballistic MU- siles (ICBMs) — SS — 18 and SvS 19 — capable of destroying the American silos. The new realia had rendered the "retaliatory strike" doctrines behind the SALT and ABM treaties obsolete and irrelevant. The long debated alternative in the form of the first-strike surviv able land-based MX missiles was ultimately discarded. In the (cont.) 290 ■ Issues