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Houstonian 1989
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 25, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22552

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1989 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 25, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22552.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1989_228.jpg
Transcript Fall Daily Cougar SUPPORT TEACHERS TO THE EDITOR: I am intrigued by the financial manipulations of the university. On one hand, there is little money for faculty raises, and there is no startup money for new faculty — yet the UH-System can spend $4 million to move to the campus. I wonder how cost- effective such a move is when the cost of space off campus is about $400,000 per year and to recoup the moving costs will require 10 years, assuming that no renovations or other changes are made in that time. I also wonder how effective the system is as a system. One can question its very existence. Spinning off the satellite campuses as independents would save the cost of the move, the cost of the system and lead to a better coordination of the central campus because there would be no need to duplicate financial and other systems. When faculty raises are less than the annual cost of living increase, when a search for a new department chairman cannot be initiated because funds are not available for startup (and no good scientist will move without funds for staff and equipment) when new courses cannot be implemented because funds for equipment are not available — yet funds can be found for a silly move — there is something wrong with our priorities. The six-year plan for the university call for 50 percent of departments to be recognized nationally, but support of the UH-System will not produce the result. Only the faculty can do so. Why not support them? Jack H.U. Brown Professor, Biology BOOKSTORE UNFAIR TO THE EDITOR: So the UH Bookstore is making a killing in profits, huh? ("Bookstore sales skyrocket," Oct. 21). I think I know why. Allow me to cite an example. Until recently, I had never purchased plastic "sheet protectors." I told the clerk that I would be needing a whole box of them. Ten minutes later she came back and told me that I could have taken 10 percent of the original price. I still thought that 45 cents was expensive ($22.50 per box of 50), but I went ahead and bought them anyway. The next day I needed more (for my lengthy EDUC report), so I went to Kwlk-Kopy, where they were only 20 cents a page. A few week later, I had another report due and decided to use sheet protectors again. Someone told me that Sam's Wholesale Club sold them at an even cheaper price. Sure enough, they were only $2.99 for a box of 50. That's only six cents each! While I don't expect our bookstore to match the prices of a wholesale club, I also don't expect our bookstore to take such an extreme advantage of us students. I, for one refuse to offer any of my hard- earned money for items that I can purchase elsewhere to this monopoly again. I encourage you to do the same. Paul "Chip" Herber Sr., Music Education STOP HECKLING ME TO THE EDITOR: The hecklers at Sen. Quayle's speech last week should be ashamed of themselves. Due to the almost incessant chanting, yelling and screaming on the part of the hecklers, I was not able to hear what Sen. Quayle, Gov. Clements and Rep. Boulter had to say. Protesters certainly have the right to peaceably assemble, to carry posters and to boo the candidate before the speech. But protesters do not have the right to chant, yell or scream while the candidate is actually talking. In doing so, protesters become hecklers and thus deny both the candidate's right to be heard and the audience's right to hear what the candidate has to say. Tuesday's heckling episode reminds one of the many instances over the past several years where conservatives attempting to deliver speeches on college campuses have been shouted down by liberal students and professors. One must wonder just how sincerely these particular students and professors really are committed to practicing the principles of academic freedom and free speech they so vigorously preach. But heckling is not a partisan issue. As a supporter of the Bush-Quayle ticket, I have to admit that some Republicans are equally guilty of violating the free speech rights of candidates during this campaign. Regrettably, many anti-abortion activists have repeatedly attempted to shout down Michael Dukakis in several of his campaign appearances in the past few weeks. Rather, heckling transcends partisan politics and constitutes a threat to the free exchange of ideas that is central to our way of electing officeholders. Theoretically at least, in our representative democracy, candidates for office come before the people and deliver speeches. Having actually heard the arguments of the candidates, the voters decide whom they will support. By interrupting candidates' speeches, hecklers undermine this process. If hecklers should continue to plague this campus, the Student Program Board should consider not inviting any more candidates to UH. Instead, we could just open the football stadium on campus, put all the college Democrats on the left side of the field, put all the college Republicans on the right side of the field, give both sides some megaphones and just let them shout at each other for a few hours each week! Richard Braastad Post-Baccalaureate Latin Teacher Education THE LAST STRAW TO THE EDITOR: OK, enough is enough. Tom Vaughan's letter criticizing the College Democrats was the last straw. His criticisms about rudeness are totally unfounded. This is, after all, an election that will shape the future of the next four years; it is not a tea with the formal cordialities that go along with that sort of thing. The Republicans have done everything in their power to avoid talking about the issues of this campaign and we will not be pulled into a discussion about whether the College Democrats did not applaud their speakers and applauded ours. There is too much at stake on November 8 to worry about whether the Young Republicans' feelings were hurt during our debate or not. Frankly, Mr. Vaughan, I don't give a damn! The students at UH want to hear about the issues on both sides of the fence, not worry about the table manners of the debaters. The College Democrats have been very civil with the Young Republicans and to ask the audience to remain stately and stiff may be normal for a Republican event, but Democrats want to get involved and we will. This cautious attitude of the Republicans towards another debate is understandable since they have lost each debate they've been involved in. They've realized that they cannot win with the issues that George Bush has taken a stand on, because the students at UH are much too sophisticated to fall for the shallow rhetoric George has spewed out in this campaign. The students want to deal with real issues that affect their lives and livelihood. George Bush has promised to do for education what Ronald Reagan has done for it in the last eight years. This is one of the more repulsive thoughts that has hit the college campuses around the country. Rising tuition rates, drastic cuts in student grants and loans, and lower government spending on education, coupled with skyrocketing expenditures for the military, are the plain facts that face us today. It is certainly no wonder that the Republicans don't want to talk about the issues. Ian A. de Souza Sr., Computer Science Letters to the Editor ■ 277