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Houstonian 1989
Residence Halls
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Residence Halls. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 18, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22487.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - Residence Halls. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22487

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1989 - Residence Halls, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 18, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22487.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Residence Halls
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1989_163.jpg
Transcript Yago invasion Students take over Moody 178 Many international students lived In the residence halls, but the largest group, by far, was attending the Yago program. The students from Spain began their stay at UH in September. Most of them were Spanish high school graduates, aged 17 to 19. They came to UH to complete a one-year college preparatory program taught in Spanish at UH — the Yago program. Most of the students lived in Moody Towers and shared rooms with American Students. "It takes time for the Americans to adjust to us," said Andres Imaz, the Yago group director of programs in the United States. "They (Americans) see our students coming down the hall and think, 'These crazy people are always smoking and shouting.' " Ramon Casabas, director of curriculum for the Yago program, said one adjustment for the students was the drinking age. In Spain, that age is 14 — a stark contrast to the United States. Ann Daley, Yago group administrative officer, said most of Residence Halls the students adjusted well to the new environment, although some of them were hesitant to interact with their American counterparts. "Although our students can speak English and understand it, they are very shy and timid about using English," she said. The program started with 100 students, but by February, only 82 remained, Imaz said. Some had dropped out and others were sent back to Spain for behavior and adjustment problems. Diego Eadola, 18, from Bilbow, Spain, said his U.S. visit was not what he thought it would be. He had been promised better accomodations than his Moody Tower room. The best part of his stay, though, was the improvement in his command of English. "I wanted to stay in the USA and I decided to go to Yago because the classes are in Spanish, but you can learn the (English) language," he said. Eadola said that although his girlfriend is American, most of his other friends are other Yago students since they share the same schedules. ► Sammye R. Rusco T