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Houstonian 1989
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - People. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22407.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - People. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22407

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1989 - People, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22407.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title People
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1989_083.jpg
Transcript lively, complex energy. In the elegy, "Fast Break," Hirsch uses a common image from the sport he knows best: basketball. To lament the too- brief life of his friend who loved the game, he invents a form and gives the poem a movement that is based on its subject matter. "I wanted to mirror the rhythm of motion in one basketball play," he says, "so the entire poem is one snake-like sentence unfolding in two-line stanzas, the language slowing or speeding up to mimic the parts of the play." In another poem, "The Skokie Theatre," Hirsch brings to life a myth of adolescence: the dizzying thrill of first love. All at once we remember the feeling of embarrassment, our hearts racing, the mingled smells of popcorn and Clearasil, but from a new perspective. Hirsch has transformed the experience, and we emerge from the poem like the young couple from the theatre, "blinking, shy . . . gripping each other's hands, trembling and changed." Writer and teacher Phillip Lopate learned early in his career that his fascination with character and human relationships would be the theme of all his work, including two books of poetry, two works of nonfiction, and two novels. His explorations run the gamut from real world human relations, as in his acclaimed Being With Children , a series of es says about his work as a teacher in the New York public schools, to his latest novel, The Rug Merchant . Fiction writer, essayist, and teacher Dr.Phillip Lopate received his B.A. from Columbia College and his Ph.D. from Union Graduate School. His 1981 books of essays, Bachelorhood: Tales of the Metropolis , was named the "Best Book of non-fiction for 1981" by the Texas Institute of Letters, and The Rug Merchant, was named one of the "Notable Books of 1987" by the American Library Association. Poet Dr.Edward Hirsh received a B.A. from Grinell College and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. His Wild Gratitude received the 1986 National Book Critics Circle Award and was named the "Best Book of Poetry for 1986" by the Texas Institute of Letters. Lopate's problem solving for The Rug Merchant began even before he knew there would be a novel — with the character of Cyrus, who had previously appeared, under a different name, in a Lopate short story. Cyrus is the result of an international amalgam of influences. "In 19th century, pre- Revolutionary Russian literature, especially in the writings of Turgenev," Lopate explains, "there exists the 'superfluous man,' a man alienated from his society, redundant in that he connects with an earlier age." Lopate was also fascinated by the "crisis of inertia" suffered by characters in the works of Japanese writer Soseki, and the well-intentioned but powerless people who inhabit the bittersweet novels of Indian writer R.K. Narayan. Yet another element of Lopate's experiences played a part in his making the protagonist an immigrant. "Writers often feel like aliens, emigres from their own culture. We keep looking for some Utopian place where literature is more respected." In keeping with these interests, Cyrus became the proprietor of a small Persian rug store on New York's Upper West Side that he inherited from his uncle. It seemed suitable for a frustrated and lonely man who is searching not for success but for "happiness" — today certainly a romantic anachronism — to work at selling hand-crafted treasures Creative writing ■ 93