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Houstonian 1989
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - People. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22405.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1989 - People. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22405

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1989 - People, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22405.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title People
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1989_081.jpg
Transcript a manner suitable for analytical electron microscopy-" To freeze tissue samples instantaneously, LoPachin and Saubermann developed a procedure called freeze clamping. The process involves the use of two copper blocks, which are fitted to a pair of pliers. The copper blocks are cooled in liquid nitrogen and then the tissue sample is pressed between them. This produces a rapidly frozen section of tissue about three millimeters thick. To prepare the sample for analysis, the researcher slices the frozen tissue into very thin sections with a glass knife, which is housed in a special chamber kept at — 55C. "Another hurdle was handling the ultra-thin tissue samples that are required in electron microscopy," Saubermann says. "Our samples are only half a micron in length, or about as small as a wavelength of light. The infinitesimal nature of the sample can only be appreciated when you realize that we handle it with a single human eye lash attached to the tip of a wooden stick." "Despite the fact that the freezing procedure can be difficult," LoPachin says, "and that handling problems are inherent in electron microscopy, the benefits of microprobe analysis far outweigh the disadvantages. Not only does computer imaging provide an excellent picture of elemental distribution — it can also tell us much about the water content of cells. Other methods for determining cell water levels are not as accurate. Precise information about water content is important, because we suspect that if a cell is injured, an increase in water level might be one of the primary causes of cell death." Although the scope of cell study is quite extensive, it is research like LoPachin's that will ultimately provide basic scientific information about the elemental composition of cells. Elements play a part in every aspect of cellular physiology, from communication to replication. Knowing how they are distributed within a cell is vital to solving one of the mysteries of science: how the cell works. ► Linda Rompf Cell Photography ■ 91