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Houstonian 1989
People
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Houstonian 1989 - People. 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 2, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22402.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989). Houstonian 1989 - People. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22402

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1989 - People, 1989, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 2, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22402.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1989
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1989, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title People
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1989_078.jpg
Transcript 1 mages of cell life Photographs serve many needs. For family members and historians, they act as the storehouses of memory. For photojournalists, they convey the facts and drama of an urgent situation. For medical researchers, they provide vital information about the mysteries of life. At the University of Houston, Dr. Richard LoPachin, assistant professor of pharmacology, is using photography to probe one of those mysteries: the distribution of elements in a cell. LoPachin is one of a select group of researchers who, with the help of computers, are taking photographic images of cells. By analyzing the structure and elements of the sciatic nerve cells of a rat, LoPachin hopes to better understand how we might best deal with the effects of disease and toxins on the body. Computer-generated photographs, while not as explicit as those taken with a camera, provide scientists with a new capacity for exploration, particularly in expanding biomedical knowledge. The technology that LoPachin is working with enables him to produce color-coded digital x-rays of nerve cells that indicate the specific locations of sodium, chlorine, calcium, and other elements found in cells. What LoPachin has discovered may have far- reaching significance. Through his research on the sciatic nerve, LoPachin has found that the various cellular regions of a normal nerve cell display characteristic concentrations of sodium, potassium, chlorine, sulfur, calcium, and phosphorous. "This is important," he says, "since the elements contained in these cellular regions provide the basis of each region's structure and function." Dr. Richard M. Lopachin, assistant professor of pharmacology, received undergraduate training at the University of Gergia, and his doctorate from the University of Wisconsin in 1981. He joined the UH faculty in 1984. 4'We found that when nerve cells were damaged by such things as chemical treatment, cutting, or reduced oxygen, the elements that normally reside outside the cell — so- dium, chlorine, and calcium — moved into the cell. Conversely, there was an outward movement of potassium that normally resides inside the cell. These results suggest that injury, no matter how it is induced, might be mediated by similar shifts in the distribution of cellular elements." He is also testing the sciatic nerves for their reactions to diseases such as diabetes and injuries froir toxic chemicals. The toxin he uses in lab tests is ac rylamide, a powdery in dustrial compound fre quently used in rural areas as a grouting agent to waterproof ditches and ir biochemical laboratories to make polyacrylamide gels, which help scientist* identify proteins by molec ular weight. LoPachin chose acryl amide because of its toxic effects on peripheral anc central nerves. Chronir exposure to this substance has been known to cause nerve degeneration and break down the outer cas ing of the nerve, resulting in ataxia, the loss of mus cle coordination. By noting photographically the reaction of the nerve cell's el ements to such poisons as acrylamide, researchers may be able to design drugs capable of fighting toxins and disease. "Based on other re search being performed on heart, kidney, and liver cells, the role elements play in cell injury is becoming increasingly important," says LoPachir. "As we expand our understanding of the distribution of cellular elements, the possibility of designing drugs that can prevent or modify injury and disease through cell activity could become a reality." The photographic technique that LoPachin uses 88 ■ People