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Houstonian 1989
People
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Houstonian 1989 - People. 1989. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 27, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22365.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1989). Houstonian 1989 - People. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22365

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1989 - People, 1989, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 27, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/22668/show/22365.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1989
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1989
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1989, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title People
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1989_041.jpg
Transcript Researcher Seeking to Cool Spacecraft UH researcher Donald Kouri's studies may one day provide a mathematical model of chemical reactions in the earth's atmosphere and provide spacecraft with a smoother ride. Kouri, a theoretical chemist, does much of his esoteric probing without ever leaving his office. "It's pencil and paper work at this stage," Kouri said. Pencil and paper is a bit of an understatement, though. From his office, Kouri has access to several supercomputers via a network that stretches from UH to the University of Minnesota and a NASA complex at Moffit Field California. Kouri said his research is based on the theory of quantum mechanics. "The theory was developed in the 1930s," Kouri said. "It is the basic theory that describes how atoms and molecules behave." In his specific field, Kouri attempts to use very complex mathematical equations to determine the probable reactions of different chemical elements in various conditions. In one theoretical example, Kouri said a diatomic molecule (a molecule consisting of two chemically bound atoms) is rammed by another atom. Researchers then try to decide if the samples reacted, swapped atoms to create different chemicals or simply bounced off each other. A variation of the same model is to electrically stimulate the diatomic molecule, which causes its two atoms to vibrate, then bump into the molecule with a slow-moving atom, Kouri said. Differences in the two reactions provide scientists with insight into how various placements of energy, might produce a poisonous gas, he said. Kouri said in the future, researchers may use these findings to better understand the earth's atmosphere, especially its reaction to pollution, and to develop materials that will allow low-heat re-entry of spacecraft. ► Michael A. Smith Professor Donald Kouri is bringing science fiction one step closer to reality with the use of a supercomputer. Photo by Robert Denton. Sci-Fi/Fantasy ■ 49