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Houstonian 1959
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1959 - History. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 27, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/2265/show/1828.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1959 - History. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/2265/show/1828

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1959 - History, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 27, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/2265/show/1828.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 1959
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Contributor (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title History
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Original Collection Houstonian http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation: "Courtesy of Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries."
File Name yearb1959017.jpg
Transcript ...history Dedication of the Journalism and Graphic Arts Building took place in 1956. The first annual Honors Day luncheon was held with Dr. William V. Houston, president of Rice Institute, filling the role of principal speaker. University of Houston sororities and fraternities became affiliated with national Greek fraternities in February. In 1957, General Bruce became the University's first chancellor through an action by the Board of Regents. At the same time, Dr. Williams became the school's fourth president. The University also added a Board of Governors the same year. A new addition to the campus was an oil derrick for the use as an experimental lab by petroleum and industrial engineering, and geology students. With 1958 came completion of the Fred G. Heyne Building. Mr. Heyne is shown above turning the first shovel of dirt for the construction of the new building. Meaning of the Seal The University of Houston seal contains, in toto, the Sam Houston family coat-of-arms. Indirectly, the University is named for Sam Houston, Texas pioneer and patriot. Directly, the name comes from the City of Houston, which is a name-sake of the General. The shield in the center of the coat-of-arms was granted by William the Conqueror in the year 1066 when the Houston family accompanied him during his invasion of England. The shield denotes a family of honor. The checkered chevron is symbolic of a family of nobility. The charges on the shield are martlets (a small bird found in Scotland similar to the Texas dove) symbolizing peace and brotherly love. In 1686 James the Second of Scotland was saved from death during a battle by the timely arrival of the Houston family and their troops. In appreciation for their service, he authorized three additional symbols to be placed on the family coat-of-arms: two greyhounds denoting speed, directness and a singleness of purpose in rendering a service to the king and country; an hour-glass with two wings to show that the aid arrived within the hour; and a scroll bearing the words "IN TIME" showing that help was in time to save the king and the nation. The following is a description of the Houston family as taken from Following General Sam Houston, a book by Amelia Williams published by the Steck Company, Austin, 1935: "The progenitor of the family was a Norman knight, one Sir Hugh of Padivan, who accompanied William the Conqueror and lent his mighty army to the conquest of England. In the distribution of the conquered lands, Sir Hugh was assigned a large strip of territory that lay along the Scottish border. There he built a stronghold, but in a few years he became enfiefed to Malcolm, king of Scotland, who was the stepson of the ambitious but ill-fated Macbeth. "Sir Hugh married a highland chieftain's daughter and identified himself with the Scots; but, as the simple Scotch people could never train their tongues to speak their lord's cognomen, Padivan, they contented themselves with calling him "Sir Hugh," and his castled estate "Hughs Town." As the generations passed, the descendants of this doughty knight came to be known as and, even to sign their own names, HOUSTON."