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Houstonian 1990
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1990 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 19, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21663.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1990 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21663

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1990 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 19, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21663.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 1990
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1990_062.jpg
Transcript Port Celebrates 75th "Houston dared to dig a ditch, and bring the sea to I its door J9 -Will Rodgers, Humorist In 1837, though Houston rested 50 miles from the Gulf of Mexico on the banks of a minor stream called the Buffalo Bayou, the town wanted a sea port. Years later, in November of 1914 President Woodrow Wilson officially opened the deep-water port, predicting the new harbor would usher in a new era of prosperity and growth for the Bayou City. The 28th President was correct in his assessment, as Houston's gateway to the world has grown to the third-busiest port in the nation and the eighth largest in the world, with nearly 5,000 ships entering annually. The Port of Houston celebrated its 75th anniversary on November 10, 1989, marking the date with a rededication ceremony and three days of festivities at the Port's Turning Basin Terminal. It was noted that following the original dedication humorist Will Rodgers was so impressed he wrote, "Houston dared to dig a ditch, and bring the sea to its door." Today, the Port of Houston is home to the second-largest petrochemical complex in the world. About 150 companies with $15 billion worth of investment line the Ship Channel. The port provides 28,000 direct jobs and 138,000 indirect jobs. "Without the port, Houston would be the size of Victoria," James Pugh, the port's executive director said. Houston's quest for the port began in 1837, when the town's founders, John and Augustine Allen, demonstrated that steam ships could navigate the Buffalo Bayou to reach the foot of Houston's Main Street. However, progress was slow, as skepticism about building a port persisted. But in 1840, the Houston Chamber of Commerce sponsored a project to dredge the waterway, and by the 1850s steam-ship traffic between Houston and Galveston was brisk. In subsequent years, other improvements were made, and many 19th century visitors were impressed and puzzled at Houston's insistence upon transforming Buffalo Bayou into an international waterway. "Houston is so intent on deepening and straightening her bayou that any vessel that can pass at the bar in Galveston may discharge at her wharves, 50 miles away," wrote Horace Greeley, the famous journalist. But in 1896, Galveston opened a 25-foot channel, assuring its dominance as a major port until a hurricane and flood devastated the island in 1900, causing about $30 million in damage. Shipping companies in search of a safe haven turned to Houston. As a result, the U.S. Congress authorized $1 million to dig a 25-foot channel. However, the funding was only enough to dig an 18-foot channel. Seeing this, Houstonians backed the project with a $1.25 million bond issue called the "Houston Plan." Work began in June 1912 and was completed by September 7, 1914. Two months later, Houston officially opened a world-class port that dwarfed Galveston's and challenged New Orleans' for dominance of the Gulf of Mexico. Today, the Port of Houston continues to broaden its horizons. Despite skeptics, on November 7, 1989 voters approved a $130 million bond issue that will fund the local contribution for an expansion plan to deepen the channel from 400 to 530 feet and widen it from 40 to 45 feet.-Ed Huber 68 RED-TAPE