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Houstonian 1990
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1990 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21639.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1990 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21639

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1990 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21639.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1990
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1990_038.jpg
Transcript Waste of Lives? HART sees an end to animal research The UH chapter of Houston Animal Rights Team wants to ban animal research on campus. HART says using animals for research is not only cruel but a needless waste of life because there are alternatives to using animals. Among the alternatives is the use of human fetuses and placentas. "It's basically afterbirth going right into the trash," Frank San Miguel, co-president of HART-UH said."T assume they would come from miscarriages and abortions." When it was noted that using human fetuses and placentas might not go over well with anti-abortionists, San Miguel, a third year journalism major, said, "I really don't have any qualms about it. Animal rights activists are concerned with the rights of animals." Robert E. Faith, Jr., director of the UH Animal Care Committee, which oversees animal use at UH, says researchers have laudable goals. "And a lot of the benefits are good for the animals too," Faith said. "Not the animals used in the experiments, of course," Faith said. "But others. For instance, dogs with cataracts." An optometry researcher with that department said he used to work with primates but no longer does. "Human cadaver corneas are more economical than working with primates and will run you even less than the price of a rabbit. And you won't have to worry about animal rights activists raiding your lab," the researcher said. ACC's Faith said the animal rights debate is one of ethics and that to "have a debate takes two sides." Yet some UH researchers said they needed clearance from Faith before they could even discuss animal rights. "I'll have to talk to Bob Faith and get approval before I release my information," Earl L. Smith III of Optometry said. Asked why he would need clearance from Faith, who is not in Optometry, Smith said, "I just want to make sure the university isn't at cross purposes with itself." Other researchers declined to be interviewed. Nor would some provide names of colleagues who might be willing to discuss the issue. One researcher, however, was willing to discuss his work. "My specialty is diarrhea. I've been studing it for 25 years," biology Professor David S. Mailman said. "I go through a dog every week or two," Mailman said. "I get them from the pound. I pay $65 an animal." Robert Armstrong, director of the Bureau of Animal Regulation and Care for the City of Houston said the city charges $35 each for cats or run- of-the-mill thirty or forty-pound, straight-legged, short-haired dogs. Beagle types." However, "For disease-free animals taken by Caesarean section, prices range up into thousands of dollars," Armstrong said. HART alleges that (nationally) many animals are wasted because of redundant experiments. Faith says redundant research is highly unlike- Yet Armstrong, whose department sold about 500 animals to UH last year, said that redundant research is not unheard of. "There have been instances (at other institutions) where redundant research was done in order to generate more research funds," Armstrong said. Julie T. Norris, assistant vice president of Sponsored Programs and a member of ACC, said, "We try to use as few animals as possible to get valid results." Norris said UH used about 6,400 animals last yar. After the experiments are terminated, the animals are "sacrificed and then disposed of through incineration," Mailman said. Norris said animals that have undergone radioactive or biological contamination are handled with special precautions. As to HART's question of whether animals suffer at the hands of UH researchers, "Under the guidelines, that is not allowed," Barbara E. De Haven, a proposal specialist, said. When posed the same question, ACC director Faith replied, "There are some experiments that can't be done any other way." Faith, who describes himself as an animal welfare advocate, said, "You cannot use an animal and create a painful situation unless you can justify it." "We have very few animals here that suffer needlessly," Faith said. Faith also said he thinks both sides will probably find common ground on which to carry on the debate. "But that's going to exclude the fringes, because the fringes are extremely closed-minded." "We are realistic, rational people/' San Miguel said, "Ideally, our goal is to see the end of animal research on campus. But we know it's not going to happen overnight. "-L. Poling 42 REI*SU*APE