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Houstonian 1990
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Houstonian 1990 - Issues. 1990. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 1, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21637.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1990). Houstonian 1990 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21637

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1990 - Issues, 1990, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 1, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21637.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 1990
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1990
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1990, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1990_036.jpg
Transcript Anti-Choice? Halt the erosion of civil rights Big Brother is among us, folks, and I am angry and frightened. All the momentum gained by the civil- liberties movements of the '60s and '70s was lost in the '80s, when the rebelliuns youth turned respectable. Since the White House became a Republican bastion, the control freaks have latched on to the resurgence of provincial moral values to dictate what we can and can't do. I am a woman. Now you know what I'm getting at. Notice that both sides of the argument call themselves "pro"- something. The terminology is telling. The "pro-life" faction implies by their nomenclature that the other side is "anti-life." Well, let's extend the metaphor in the other direction to find the true kernel of the issue: "pro-life" really means "anti- choice." These people are trying to get laws made which will take away my most fundamental right. My body is the only thing I had when I started this life and it's the only thing I'll take with me when it's over; my body is the only thing that really is mine. It terrifies me as much to think about a bunch of politicians in big buildings with a lot of money who want to take control of my body from me as to think about a man behind the bushes with a knife who wants to take control of my body from me. I feel equally vulnerable to forcible physical captivity in either case. At least the man in the bushes won't hold me against my will for nine months. And he's only victimizing me — one person. If he gets caught, he'll go to jail because he's not supposed to force me to submit to his will. But a ban on abortion would force me to submit to another's will in very much the same way. In addition to that, the baby in question would be an unwanted burden to its mother; the baby would be victimized because a baby whose mother doesn't want it is behind before the start. In addition to my mounting concern for my own right, and that of all people (not just women), to live free of others' imposed moral judgements, I think of the right of the babies to live happy lives. Let's take their side, for once. There are thousands of people out there who are desperate to adopt children because they can't have their own. I'm sure many of them are active in the pro-life movement. They probably can't stand to see babies going to waste. I admire that. It would make elegant sense to match up adoptive parents with women who'd rather not be mothers for whatever reason, so that people who want children can get them, women who don't want children don't have to keep them and the children are loved and properly cared for. I shouted that last part for a reason; it was to reintroduce reality with as gentle a crunch as possible. See, the people who want to adopt babies are most likely to be successful baby boomers who can afford children. The bald reality which still makes us liberals grit our teeth is that a whole lot of those successful baby boomers want only physically-sound, Caucasian newborns. Those who will consider adopting minority children, older children or those with physical, mental or emotional handicaps are depressingly few. So what happens to the surplus kids nobody wants to adopt? It's a big problem now; imagine how much worse it will be if everyone has to carry every baby to term. I wish abortion didn't have to ex ist. I wish every woman who got pregnant did so deliberately, with love in her heart for the future child, with adequate prenatal care to see [ that the baby has the best chance to develop the way it's supposed to, and with careful plans to nurture and rear the child to adulthood. But we must be realistic here. Women (and girls) often don't plan to get pregnant, and certainly don't always want babies. Why must we increase the number of unwanted people, at the cost of so much pain to those very same unwanted people? I always come back to the welfare of the children, which people on the other side of the fence would get hopping mad about. They would say that, since I favor the preserva tion of all my rights, and most of all my reproductive rights, that I am denying the rights of the unborn. On the contrary, it is much more cruel to bring a child into the world whose chances of being loved and happy are dismal from the start, to say nothing of the damage done the captive mother, than simply to avoid its birth. For every woman who chooses not to have a child and has an abortion, there is another who keeps the baby. Of those who keep their babies, all too few turn out to be good mothers. A lot of them don't know or don't care about how to maintain their health during pregnancy. The wards are full of sick infants who never should have been born. Some go home to neglect or abuse, and some grow up to continue the whole bleak cycle. No, I am not "anti-life" because I am "pro-choice." I am against the sadness, the despair, the hardship caused to both parties concerned when a woman is forced by law to bear a child she does not want. I am for quality of life, rather than mere existence. Most important, though, is my conviction that we must do something to halt the insidious erosion of NOW AT WORK — The UH chapter of National Organization f<>i Women (NOW) set up a hooth in the Satellite lt> collect signatures to be presented to the legislature in Austin to prevent an anti-abortion bill being introduced on the floor after the Supreme Court struck down portions of the Roe v. Wade decision in June of 1989. Photo by led Mikeasky. civil liberties in this country. By not standing still for right-wing coercion, reproductive and otherwise, we can remind ourselves that our democracy is meant to be free of tyranny. The people who founded this country did so because they were tired of being pushed around by the privileged few who seldom had to cope with the downsides of their dictates. I respect the beliefs of those who think abortion is bad. I demand that they respect my right to choose my own course of action, regardless of what it may be. -Deidre Carpenter 38 REF""*ftPE RE Issued PE 39