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Houstonian 1990
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1990 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 22, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21635.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1990 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21635

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1990 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 22, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21635.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1990
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1990_034.jpg
Transcript Drug War Mounts City, state, nation declare war The war on drugs is mounting. President George Bush declared a war on drugs. The state of Texas, Houston and UH have joined the battle. The Just-Say-No organization has a foothold in practically every elementary school in the United States. The streets of middle-class neighborhoods resound with the crackle of automatic weapons. Drive-by shootings are common. In the nation's capital, crack dealers ply their trade. The broken vials and discarded paraphernalia litter the gutters. Welcome to America 1989. These are the facts. It is not a joke. It is not the setting for a movie. It is not fiction. "Drugs are sapping our strength as a nation," Bush said. About 72 million Americans have used illegal drugs at least once according to the House Select Committee on Narcotics Abuse and Control. That figure translates as 37 percent of the population over the age of 12. The causal use of illegal drugs fell in 1988 by one third indicating that fewer people in the U.S. are using drugs on a purely recreational basis. But, the frequent or habitual use of cocaine rose by a DRUG BUST -UH police officials reported eight substance abuse arrests during the 1988-89 school year. Only two of those busts involved UH faculty, students or staii.Photo by Art Hale. third during the same time period. In addition, the White House estimates that only 40 percent of the more than two million American drug users who want treatment are receiving it. Part of Bush's drug plan calls for $322 million to be spent on increasing treatment facilities. Many congressmen are critical of this sum and the emphasis of the entire plan. "It's going to be a many, many year effort and it's going to require much more money and effort," House Speaker Thomas Foley, D-Washington, said. "I think the problem has reached not only every city in the country, but rural areas as well." Other congress members applauded the plan. "He put the focus right where it needs to be and that is right in the laps of every individual American," Rep. Tom DeLay, R- Sugar Land, Texas, said. In a televised speech, Bush said that severe penalties would be imposed on anyone involved in dealing drugs. "If you sell drugs, you will be caught. And when you're caught, you will be prosecuted," Bush said. "And, once you're convicted, you will do time." Bush announced that American troops and equipment would be utilized in the drug war. "When requested," he said, "we will make available the appropriate resources of America's armed forces." Eight OA-37 fighter jets and two C-130 cargo planes have been sent to Columbia along with military personnel to train locals in the usage of the equipment. Bush's internal plan focuses on punishment and treatment but also on education. Colleges, universities and state institutions must adopt strict drug policies in order to continue to receive federal funds. "The war on drugs will be hard won. Neighborhood, by neighborhood. Block by block. Child by child," Bush said. In Texas, a new law allows the state government to tax illegal drugs. Two stamps which say that drugs equal death and taxes were devised to levy the fee. One depicts the Grim Reaper and the other the skull and crossbones. The legislature is using the stamps to charge a $3.50- per-gram tax on marijuana and a $200-per-gram tax on other controlled substances such as cocaine. The Texas state comptroller's office is selling the stamps to anyone who wishes to buy them. It is not illegal to have a tax stamp. All sales information about purchasers is kept confidential. Dealers apprehended with drugs not bearing the stamps face not only drug-selling charges, but tax eva- 36 RE I Issues iPE