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Houstonian 1990
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1990 - Issues. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 30, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21630.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1990 - Issues. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21630

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1990 - Issues, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 30, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21919/show/21630.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1990
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Issues
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1990_029.jpg
Transcript The assignment had more than its share of surprises, including the downplay of the significance of Leland's disappearance by his Washington staff, said Cobb. "His staff was saying, 'Oh Mickey's a crazy guy, he does what he wants to, we're not worried about him,'" she said. "We seemed to take it more seriously than they did, because our experience with Mickey in Hanoi and Ho Chi Minh City was just completely the opposite. We were on a regimented schedule." The mountainous Ethiopian terrain in the rainy season also surprised the reporters, who expected everything from jungles to deserts. Even U.S. Air Force personnel in the search teams wore clothing inappropriate to the actual environment, Cobb said. Other surprises included the absence of telephones at the airport, stringently enforced curfews, telephone rates of $750 per hour at the hotel, official Ethiopian "minders" to prevent U.S. cameramen from taking pictures of proscribed sights, and primitive working conditions in which money became the lubricant to get the job done. "You brought cash and bribed everyone in the building," said Dows, Zindler's cameraman. Duckworth said, "The government controlled the amount of time you got on the transmitter and they tried to gouge everybody for satellite time. They had no equipment and the technicians didn't know the gear. And they didn't cooperate unless you had money for them. It was a nightmare." Amy Huggins agreed: "Sometimes it was a miracle just to get something out." David Einsel, Houston Chronicle photographer, experienced problems sending still photos back to the United States. "The phone systems couldn't handle the frequencies, so we relayed through AP in New York and Reuters in Washington. And the time difference had me up in the middle of the night transmitting my photos," he said. Although Ethiopia's state- controlled television and newspaper covered the story, none of the workers at the airport would talk to reporters, panelists said. In addition, the constant presence of Ethiopian troops carrying AK-47s at the airport and in the city's streets added to the tension. Reingold was frustrated to find that embassy officials were saying only what they had been told to say by Washington, D.C. The U.S. military spokesmen were even more tight-lipped. The day Leland's plane was found, an Air Force colonel sought permission to tell reporters, but the officer in charge had just arrived and didn't know what was going on. It delayed the release of the information. "If it wasn't for Sen. Ackerman spilling his guts at the airport, we wouldn't have known anything about the crash site," Dows said. "It would have been just Air Force ter- QUESTIONS AND ANSWERS- Houston Chronicle photographer Dave Einsel displayed photographs taken of the Mickey Leland tragedy while on assignment in Ethiopia. Panelists answered questions following the SPJ sponsored event. Photo by Robert Dante. minology." Eventually, the reporters made arrangements to pool information. "If we'd screwed each other, we wouldn't have gotten out of there," Huggins said. "We fed the pool first." Einsel displayed several photographs of the crash site taken from the open door of a C-130 transport plane. The totality of the destruction at the crash location astounded several panel members. The force of the impact was demonstrated by the fact the Air Force returned only 13 body bags for the 16 people aboard Leland's plane. Theories on the cause of the crash abound. After viewing the site from the air, Einsel surmised, "The pilot looked like he was following the river, just under the weather. And from the burn spot, it looks like he just nosed straight into the mountain. If he'd been 200 feet higher, he would have cleared the ridge and gotten into valley. But he just went straight in — full force. Despite obstacles, technical glitches and last-minute scrambling, Houston's media was quick to realize that Houston's news isn't limited to the city's borders. "Our station will go anywhere where there's a story or a problem that involves people in this area," Zindler said. "The only thing different I'd do is to make sure we have the equipment to send the stuff back." -Ed Huber REDbsiyVPE 31