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Houstonian 1980
Luminaries
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1980 - Luminaries. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. April 16, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21601/show/21348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1980 - Luminaries. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21601/show/21348

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1980 - Luminaries, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed April 16, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/21601/show/21348.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Houstonian 1980
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Luminaries
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1980_082.jpg
Transcript 4IVIRSITYOF HOUSTON / he Uaily IMnar H HOUSTON TtXA$ M*J VOt~TT~^ ^5 ^B-==— ^V*>'' %mM TUISOA' I a III i 11 Idll CI Ull Presiden t 's n om in ee fails //> in>t nnnrnrnl nf rg>&g>ni& The Daily Couiar • Of HOUiTQ* HOU4TO* TtXAS \mmM VOt u. *n tt "■- — ~ , ^^ tlL. _ ^| JP THUHSOATT. HPT feM«t » i; ^ Regents pick acting president Victoria chancellor gets position ■> muan ro»» rutiD*r. si pttwet« u, im iidency C«mpu», *ai repS»<* M»w»»« •» 1 TheDailuGouQ Bishop selected UH Systems I ar The changing of the guard: Hoffman: No appointee, no president and a long search. 1980: The 84 Philip Hoffman in his 17 years at UH, was an elusive figure outside the ramparts of the Ezekiel Cullen Building. Robert Maxson, in his four-month stay as interim president, went a long way toward changing the image of the invisible presidency. Maxson was plucked from the chancellor's job at the UH Victoria Center after Hoffman's abrupt resignation and quickly became one of the best-known and most-popular administrators in years. It wasn't unusual to spot him strolling around the campus. He even venturedinto the Coffeehouse, a popular dive for students but not one normally associated with elusive administrative types. More than one student fed up with the administration's laissez-faire attitude about the students praised Maxson for finally acknowledging the presence of those who pay, and dearly,"for UH diplomas. "A dynamo" is how the president of the student association at Victoria portrayed Maxson. In Houston he lived up to this image. Maxson's style of administrating was more freewheeling than that of Hoffman, yet was well- suited to the central campus. After a while Maxson returned to Victoria. He left, but only after making the UH presidency more popular than ever before. Maxson: A "dynamo" in the president's chair. resident The Cougar and the shuffle. presidents Why Hoffman quit When talking about power politics, it's always good to keep in mind that things are not always as they appear to be on the surface. Such is the case of Philip G. Hoffman, president of the UH System. On Sept. 10, Hoffman shocked the university by announcing his resignation at a meeting of the board of regents. The resignation came after the board voted down his recommendation that Dr. Joseph Champagne be named interim chancellor of the UH Downtown College. The board instead chose Dr. Allen Commander, the university's lobbyist in Austin and Washington. Commander was a man whom one regent described as one who "fell out of favor with his boss" — Hoffman. Commander, who hungered for the permanent chancellorship at the Downtown College, went over Hoffman's head and spoke with members of the board himself, and the regents ultimately chose him over Champagne. Hoffman claimed that he could not work for a board which did not have confidence in him, and said he resigned "on principle." And here ends the story on the surface: Hoffman exits as a hero, a man of principle. But there is more. Many people at the university were taken by surprise by the news of Hoffman's resignation. But there were a few who were not. Hoffman is not an impulsive man. He is an intelligent man who will not take a major action unless he is certain of what the consequences will be. Hoffman is also a man who found himself quickly losing his power at the University of Houston. This decline goes deeper than the Commander-Champagne incident, and has its roots in the Ginnie Mae investment scandal of 1977-78. In the spring of 1978, the board of regents declared its independence from Hoffman and reorganized the personnel in the UH System — Dave Hurlbut, Daily Cougar fall editor Hoffman's domain. In that reorganization, Hoffman's financial vice president (who by that time was chief financial officer for the Central Campus) effectively was fired; his executive vice president was told to concentrate solely on financial affairs; and his vice president for development was relieved of his major responsibility of private fund raising. Three important events followed that. During the last legislative session, Hoffman found himself at odds with Commander for the first time on the issue of financing university construction. Then, early this summer, the regents altered Hoffman's proposal to move the UH System administrative offices to the plush Galleria*area, opting instead to move to cheaper quarters in Houston United Bank on the Gulf Freeway. And on Sept. 10, the regents rejected Hoffman's recommendation of Champagne for UHDC interim chancellor, which precipitated Hoffman's resignation. So the question is this: Was Hoffman's resignation in fact a "premeditated" action? Before Sept. 10, word was circulating in the UH System administrative offices that there was a chance Champagne might not get the regents' seal of approval. It was also circulated that Hoffman would resign if the board turned against him. Also, a few regents met at Hoffman's house for dinner the night before the meeting, and regent Charles Morino said later that there were "rumors" after dinner that Hoffman resign over the UHDC affair. Did those regents believe that Hoffman was bluffing? A man who plays his cards conservatively does not bluff, and Hoffman has always played his cards closely. What is more likely is that both Hoffman and the board of regents sensed the inevitable: Hoffman had to leave. A number of authoritative sources have been predicting that for a long time, and a lot of things support the notion that Hoffman's resignation was no spontaneous act of principle. Some people — regents among them — felt that Hoffman got caught up in the growing pangs of change, and that the university had outgrown his style of administration. "When you start running a multi-million dollar, multi-campus system, you have to run things a little differently than you did in 1962," one regent said. When Hoffman first assumed the presidency in 1962, there were no branch campuses, not many buildings, and only a few students. UH was, in every sense of the derisive term, Cougar High. But under Hoffman's guidance, UH grew into a respected four-campus university system, with the responsibility for the education of about 45,000 people. And clearly, the university's tremendous growth was the result of Hoffman's efforts. But bigness brings on new problems, and in 1978, those problems rocked the university with a short- term investment scandal which ultimately cost the university millions of dollars. The problem with UH's short- term investments was symptomatic of using little administration principles to govern a big institution. The man responsible for building up the university's financial entanglement was allowed to do so because there was no one overseeing what he did. The result: no one knew there was a problem until it was too late. Hoffman put a lot of faith in his "good old boys," and there was not much accountability. This was symptomatic of an outgrown administration, and was one reason for Hoffman's declining power with the board of regents. The regents felt it was time for a change in style, and Hoffman had trouble adapting. It was this, rather than the appointment of Commander, which made Hoffman's resignation inevitable. 85