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Houstonian 2002
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Houstonian 2002 - Community. 2002. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 28, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20875/show/20766.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(2002). Houstonian 2002 - Community. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20875/show/20766

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 2002 - Community, 2002, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 28, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20875/show/20766.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 2002
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 2002
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 2002, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Genre (AAT)
  • school yearbooks
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Community
File Name yearb_2002_161.jpg
Transcript 11-01 It was once said that life in America could be divided into two distinct eras separated by the Civil War. A third epoch could be added to the history of our great nation as events unfolded on one calm fall morning. The tragedy that befell our great nation on September 11,2001 began at 8:46 a.m. Eastern Time as American Airlines flight 92 was hijacked by Islamic fundamentalists and slammed into World Trade Center 2, the second tallest building in the United States. Twenty minutes later, another airplane hit World Trade Center 1. Over the next hour, hundreds of firefighters raced up the stairwells to fight the raging fires now burning a thousand feet above the southern tip of Manhattan. Millions across the nation became fixed on their radios and television sets watching the horror in New York unfold, word came that a third plane had struck the Pentagon in Washington, D.C., killing more than 180 people. Shortly after that, a fourth plane that was hijacked crashed in a field in Pennsylvania after brave passengers on board fought with the terrorists for control of the plane, and prevented it from harming any civilians on the ground,. Just when it seemed things couldn't get any worse, Tower 1, and then Tower 2 collapsed in ruins, killing about 2,830 people from over 80 countries around the world. The immediate aftermath of these terrorist attacks was a cornucopia of fear, anger, hatred, and utter disbelief. American life was turned upside down in a heartbeat, and as night fell over the remains of the World Trade Center, The World Trade Center... Before September 11th, two towers stood proudly against New York City's skyline. The ruins of the World Trade Center, commonly referred to as "Ground Zero," became hollowed ground where thousands of civilians from more than eighty nations perished. Photo by Steven R. Lewis oil/ ^©mmuiiity God Bless America Drivers speed under a decorated overpass on Interstate-10. After the September 11th terrorist attacks the country became united in its grief for the overwhelming tragedy of the destruction of the World Trade Center. Flags flew proudly in front yards and in front of businesses throughout the city as Americans mourned the loss and longed for justice. Photo by Max Lacayo many were still watching TV, thirsty for any information they could get. All air travel across the nation was suspended for the next week, as the FAA struggled to implement tougher security at the nation's airports. The world rallied to the side of the United States, and Americans were touched in the following days by the condolences of other nations, and the playing of the Star Spangled Banner at Buckingham Palace in Great Britain, the Eiffel Tower in France, and the Brandenburg Gate in Germany. Flags flew at half mast for several weeks following the tragedy, and they were everywhere. Many stores and websites reported six to eight week backlogs on flag orders, as demand for "All-American" merchandise skyrocketed. The city of Houston was no exception, as flags waived proudly in front of businesses and bumper stickers appeared on cars proclaiming proud slogans such as "These Colors Don't Run." Houston's Bush Intercontinental Airport was hailed as one of the safest airports in the country. Americans were indivisible in the pursuit of justice for the perpetrators of the terrible tragedy of September 1 lth as they have never been before. This atrocity has established itself as one of the most defining moments in our nations history, and from America's saddest moment came America's finest hour: when we united in the face of overwhelming horror to eradicate the evil of terrorism from the world forever. Story by Matthew E. Caster September 11, 2001 <551>