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Houstonian 1994
Academics
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1994 - Academics. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 26, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20605/show/20402.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1994 - Academics. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20605/show/20402

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1994 - Academics, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 26, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20605/show/20402.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1994
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Academics
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1994_060.jpg
Transcript The Wake Shield Facility held in the grasp of Discovery's Remote Manipulator System. Photo courtesy NASA Alex Ignatiev, VEC program director, holds a scale model the wake shield. Photo courtesy Daily Cougar Ine UH satellite touched down on earth on Febuary 11,2:19:22 pm (EST) aboard Space Shuttle Discovery. Photo courtesy NASA fepace Shuttle Discovery orbits above the Atlantic Ocean, with the UH Wake Shield Facility. Photo courtesy NASA Establishing UH as a Top Research University NASA's first shuttle mission of 1994 helped launch UH's future in revolutionizing electronics The UH Space Vacuum Epitaxy Center Program with its development of the Wake Shield Facility, has proven once again that UH is a genuine top rate research university. The $13.5 million Wake Shield Facility, a 12-foot diameter, 9,000 pound satellite was tested in space aboard NASA's Space Shuttle Discovery and for two days it was extended from the shuttle, but it did have its problems. First, it seemed as if the UH satellite never wanted to leave as it stayed parked on the space shuttle Discovery for an extra night, but as it finally left earth, it marked the first shuttle mission of 1994 which was also the first for UH - the first NASA payload to be developed in Texas. In space, an accidental shower of shuttle waste water floated toward the exposed sensitive satellite. Then a jerky start to its ride on the shuttle robot which looked much like a flying arm caused more worry. Finally, when ground controllers could receive no signals from the satellite, astronauts peered out the payload bay window and believed the on/off lights on the satellite were switched off. Though it had its glitches, the shuttle mission was a success for UH. "It's exciting to have the opportunity to be part of a NASA project. This really says something about the vision of this university and our goals for the community," said UH President James Pickering. An eight-day shuttle flight typically "This really says something about the vision of this university and our goals for the community," Dr. James Pickering costs about $413 million, but NASA waived all costs to UH because the university is a commercial center for space development. The shuttle team consisted of Cmdr. Charles Bolden, Pilot Ken Reightler, Flight Engineer and former UH physics professor Ronald Sega, Mission Specialist Jan Davis, Mission Specialist Franklin Chang-Diaz and the first Russian cosmonaut to participate in a NASA shuttle mission Sergi Konstantinovich Kirkalev. The Wake Shield was designed as a test in growing super-pure semiconductor material for computer chips. The computer chips could be used to allow the production of small, lap-top supercomputers, video telephones and other electronic devices yet to be imagined. If the process is successful, computers could run 10 times faster than any today. This will make UH a key player in revolutionizing electronics. Former UH Physics professor and current astronaut Ronald Sega has likened the process to "looking at a speed boat and visualizing the water behind it. The faster you go, the less the water fills in behind it." UH is now one of the 16 centers for the commercial development of space. Private businesses are already investing in this "super chip" business. Not only did the program bring great scientist to the university, it also transformed the education of some students in ways other institutions never will. -JoAnn Stephens 88 6D Academics Wake Shield Facility 62) 89