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Houstonian 1994
Academics
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Houstonian 1994 - Academics. 1994. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. March 29, 2015. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20605/show/20400.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

(1994). Houstonian 1994 - Academics. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20605/show/20400

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Houstonian 1994 - Academics, 1994, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed March 29, 2015, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20605/show/20400.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1994
Creator (Local)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Place of Creation (TGN)
  • Houston, Texas
Date 1994
Description This edition of the Houstonian, published in 1994, is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Topical (LCSH)
  • College yearbooks
  • University of Houston
Language English
Type (DCMI)
  • Text
  • Still Image
Original Item Location Houstonian
Original Item URL http://library.uh.edu/record=b1158762~S11
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please cite the item using the citation button.
File Name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Academics
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
File Name yearb_1994_058.jpg
Transcript Dr. Michael Parks and his students work on improving the computer technology at UH. Photo by Cesar Alverez. CyberTechnology UH jumps on the high-tech bandwagon Technology, a friendly world of abundant information, paves its way through countless passages at UH. At an astonishing rate computer technology has become more pertinent to daily life. In school and at work, there's no escaping the "information super-highway." UH has helped open these avenues by the intergradation of innovative projects. In a nationwide experiment with three other universities, UH's Counseling and Testing Center has brought the first computerized GRE testing to the campus. Since 1990, UH students have had the option of either computer or paper forms of the test. The Education Testing Service, the company that creates the GRE and others such as the SAT, will require all test-takers to use the computerized format by 1996. "One of the things students really appreciate is that all they have to do is hit a key when they're finished and there is their score," said Gerald Osborne, assistant vice president for Counseling and Testing. Another expansion of UH's information super-highway was a project in the College of Business Administration. Students enrolled in a decision information systems special problems classes led by Michael Parks, Ph.D. for the past year and a half have been working on a Kiosk computer program. A Kiosk is a touch screen computer that would allow students to find helpful information by simply touching a corresponding place on the screen. This system would enable students to access maps, events and other information. In addition to the computer technology, the Kiosk uses VHS video and stereo sounds to inform the user, Parks said. This kind of technology has had a great response from the business world, Parks said. Conoco donated the network lines and IBM supplied some of the hardware. Three of the Kiosks were slated to be available on campus for the Spring semester. "Our goal would be to have 100 of these around campus in a network system. If every building had one, then people could get any information they desired at their fingertips," he said. Students were grouped to be responsible for designing a button on the screen. Michael Khushf, a business administration senior, had been working on the project since its beginning. "It is so user-friendly and visually appealing with actual video incorporated in it that more and more places will be wanting to install it," he said. For the first time in UH history, phone access for enrollment options was available for priority add/ drop in the spring. The service was used for operational experimentation. Without standing in line for hours, students could access the service by calling a special number in the class schedule was listed with instructions and options. A student wouldn't have to read a posted computer printout of closed sections. Typewriters have replaced word processors and word processing computer programs are replacing word processors. Consequently, compact discs have driven the last nail in the grave of 8 track tapes. In fact, computer use and knowledge is beneficial in a world invaded by technology. America's campuses are becoming the forefront of technology, and just like at UH technological changes are taking place. The information superhighway running through our schools homes and offices will effect us all. -Jessica Ellis 86 6D Academics