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Houstonian 1979
Campus Life
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Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1979 - Campus Life. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 20, 2014. http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20342/show/20013.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston. Houstonian 1979 - Campus Life. Houstonian Yearbook Collection. Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20342/show/20013

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Students of the University of Houston, Houstonian 1979 - Campus Life, Houstonian Yearbook Collection, Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 20, 2014, http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb/item/20342/show/20013.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Compound Item Description
Title Houstonian 1979
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Language English
Format (IMT)
  • image/jpeg
Digital Collection Houstonian Yearbook Collection
Digital Collection URL http://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/yearb
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Repository URL http://info.lib.uh.edu/about/campus-libraries-collections/special-collections
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name index.cpd
Item Description
Title Campus Life
Creator (LCNAF)
  • Students of the University of Houston
Caption The Houstonian is the official yearbook of the University of Houston.
Subject.Name (LCNAF)
  • University of Houston
Repository Special Collections, University of Houston Libraries
Use and Reproduction This image is in the public domain and may be used freely. If publishing in print, electronically, or on a website, please use the citation button above. To request higher resolution images, please use the Request High Res button above.
File name yearb_1979_054.jpg
Transcript AND LOSES ordered a halt to the program and all of the university's holdings in the bond market were sold off. By that time, Harwell had accumulated obligations totalling roughly $450 million. From late 1977 throughout 1978 and up to the early part of January 1979, proved to be an arduous time of resolution of the university's short-term investment problems. UH Regent Robert Grainger, vice president of one of Houston's major brokerage firms and a member of the regent's investment and finance committee, killed himself with a shot gun in December 1977, after becoming increasingly upset over the growing magnitude of the scandal. Several UH financial officials were fired or pressured into quitting. And in January 1979, audits from Arthur Young and Co. told the university that more than $14 million had to be subtracted from the books in order to set things aright. Top UH officials, including Aaron Farfel, Philip C. Hoffman, Barry Munitz and Roger Singleton, all say the losses will not be felt in the classroom, and to a certain extent, they have been right. Accounts for faculty salaries and academic departments were not affected by the "downward adjustment." But monies for construction were. So were emergency funds for the residence halls. As for Sam Harwell? He and his half-brother, Patrick Sullivan, were tried in federal court on charges of mail fraud, wire fraud and conspiracy to defraud in a different incident. Harwell allegedly wrote a letter to a bank in California saying that Sullivan could act on the university's behalf in some financial matters. Sullivan allegedly used that authorization to secure a $2 million line of credit at the bank, using certificates of deposit owned by the university as collateral. Sullivan allegedly used the money to buy office buildings, a Nevada mining operation and a contract to manufacture laundry trucks for the Kingdom of Jordan. Harwell and Sullivan were sentenced in 1978 to serve four years in a federal penitentiary. Another money game, a $136,000 one played at UH's Continuing Education Center, was described by university officials as "money that just didn't make it to the bank." In June 1978, when KULF radio first triggered an investi gation into the Center's funds, the amount missing was reported at $5,000. Chancellor Barry Munitz then began a university investigation into the Center. The university began audits of the ( entei going back to 1975. As the audit continued, the amount ol missing funds increased constantly and when completed in December 1978, the audit showed a $136,428 loss. The missing funds were cash that was paid for real estate courses offered at the Center. Most ol the money, about $104,000, was lost in 1976 and 1977. Almost $30,000 was lost in 1978 and a smaller amount, $2,877, was lost in 1975, the last year audited. Unlike the university's investment scandal, no one has yet been held responsible for the Center's losses. The only explanation offered by [l\\ olln i.ils is that, "Money collected for the courses was never pul into the h.mi- George Young, an assistant dean and assistant professor at the Center, was assisting the university in its mtcm.il investigation when he committed suicide on )une 1 1, 1978. He had not been a< i used ol an The finane iaI problems at 1 he ( enter have led to ti^litei policies and proc eclures ior handling < ash and an admit trative reorganization. Dean James Taylor, formerly the director of the entire Center, is now dire* tiny; the I lilton School of Hotel and Restaurant Management. Judy Mar- koe is temporary director of the educ ation c enter while a search is on for a permanent direc tor. lei ry I or d is operations manager for the CEC. But the answers to this money game are still a mystery. UH officials know the money is gone, but that is about all. Although Young was never accused, any light he could have shed on the matter is gone forever and his death, the day after the university began its investigation, only adds to the mystery. To this day, no one has been indicted for the Center's losses, and no one is currently under investigation. — Dave Hurlbut Mark Lang ford